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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Biotechnology
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Record #:
8008
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A panel of life-sciences experts--Don deBethizy, CEO of Targacept, Inc., a Winston-Salem company developing treatments for central nervous system disorders; Jan Turek, CEO of Biolex Therapeutics, Inc., a Pittsboro drug-maker; Jeff Clark, managing general partner of the Aurora Funds, a Durham venture-capital company; Robert McMahan, Gov. Michael Easley�s science adviser; and Sam Taylor, president of the North Carolina Biosciences Organization, a trade group based in the Research Triangle Park--discuss the state of biomanufacturing in North Carolina, whether the state can compete in this market, and the new North Carolina Research Campus being built in Kannapolis.
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Record #:
10109
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine asked some of the state's leaders in the biotechnology to address industry issues. The respondents were Norris Tolson, Sam Taylor, Chris Kroeger, Vipin Garg, and Sarah Yovcum.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p14-16, 17, 18-21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10258
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A round-table discussion, moderated by Murray, discusses whether promoting biotechnology in other sections of North Carolina will weaken its base in the Research Triangle region.
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Record #:
10940
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The Research Triangle forged the state's reputation as a biotechnology power. Murray, managing editor of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA, discusses with leaders of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center the efforts of the industry to extend the sector to other sections of the state. The center is a nonprofit that promotes biotechnology and lobbies on its behalf.
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Record #:
19255
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North Carolina has always been known for its manufacturing. Now biotechnology is changing manufacturing in the state, including what it makes, what it needs, and how it is seen. In 2011, this growing industry employed over 18,000 people in fifty locations across the state. Business North Carolina assembled a panel of experts to discuss how biotechnology fits in the state's economy, and this article contains their discussions.
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Record #:
21838
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Many biotechnology discoveries and products are made in the state. The $59 billion it puts into the state's economy is second behind agriculture, and it employs 237,000 people. Business North Carolina recently gathered a panel of experts to discuss questions such as What role will biotechnology play in the state's future? and What does it need to get there? as well as other questions. The published transcript is edited for brevity and clarity.
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Record #:
22070
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Venture capital is slow coming into North Carolina. However, Money Tree Report, a summary of national fourth quarter venture capital investment, indicated NC businesses received $110 million in 2013. One business, biotechnology, received over $70 million of the amount. The article includes a listing of the top biotechnology employers in NC. IMB Corp is first with Time Warner Cable second. It also includes a chart showing what companies received what amounts of the $70 million.
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Record #:
24192
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Floyd Chilton discusses his business, Pilot Therapeutics Inc., and the difficulty he had with running a business on his own.
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24247
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The Piedmont Triad Metropolitan Area is slowly becoming a competitor for Charlotte and the Research Triangle as a result of painstaking planning and long-needed cooperation among governmental units and agencies. The Triad is not only a manufacturing center, it also offers support to entrepreneurs and access to university research services.
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25895
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Mike Ramsey is a chemist and a pioneer in the field of microfluids. He uses biotechnology to develop microscopic lab tests that can be controlled by computers. Ramsey is currently working on nanofluid technology to sequence DNA.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p18-20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27155
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Neil Harbisson is a cyborg activist who had a Wi-Fi enabled antenna osseointegrated into his skull. It allows the colorblind artist to hear the light frequencies of color, from visible to ultraviolet and infrared. Harbisson will speak about this controversial issue in Durham this weekend.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 20, May 2016, p26-27, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28471
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Life-sciences companies are using the smallest organism to improve North Carolina’s largest industry, agriculture. The magazine and the N.C. Biotechnology Center assembled a panel of experts who discuss where research on the microbiome stands, how it is being implemented, and what the results will be. Research could make it easier to cultivate crops in harsher conditions, making it easier to feed the world.
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28369
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Many people oppose genetically modified foods, but others, like NC State University’s Arthur Weissinger, modify foods to improve the health of those eating the foods. One of the major issues surrounding the movement is the lack of trust between the biotechnology industry and consumers who believe the industry is ultimately out to make a profit, not make lives better. Many are also afraid that the lack of regulation could cause health and environmental disasters and affect biodiversity, fragile communities, and the control of the food supply.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 27, July 1992, p6-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
30189
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North Carolina agriculture contributes millions of dollars to the state’s economy, and cultivates diverse commodities and businesses. The industry is also constantly changing with new technology, farm programs and policies. This article explores changes underway for farmers, processors, scientists and consumers.
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Record #:
36255
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The life sciences sector provides job growth for areas such as research, development, and manufacturing. It also fuels funding ventures such as business loans from the Biotech Center. Collectively, this data measures the economic and occupational impact this sector makes on North Carolina.