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4 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 254, Nov/Dec 1988
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Record #:
34118
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s fourth National Water Summary released in October indicates that the overall quality of the nation’s groundwater is good, but management and protection of groundwater resources remain major challenges. In North Carolina, the most common naturally occurring groundwater quality problem is the presence of saltwater in all aquifers in the eastern region. Contamination from landfills, waste lagoons, underground storage tanks, and accidental chemical spills also contribute to water quality problems.
Record #:
34116
Author(s):
Abstract:
State government in North Carolina has been helping localities protect their water supplies since 1888 when Raleigh enacted special legislation for the protection of Walnut Creek watershed. Since then, water treatment technology has improved water purification but more efforts are needed to protect undeveloped watersheds under multiple jurisdictions. This article provides recommendations for legislative and executive actions to watershed protection.
Record #:
34117
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources is reviewing comments in preparation for making final recommendations for allocating water supply storage in Jordan Lake to local water authorities. In a draft allocation plan, the towns of Cary and Apex and Chatham/Orange Counties will receive all the water supply they requested to fill immediate need, but most long-range allocations will be deferred.
Record #:
34115
Author(s):
Abstract:
The elimination of federal funding for wastewater and water supply projects has increased the financial burden on state and local governments. North Carolina is searching for the least costly way of providing public water supplies which are critical not only to public health, but also to business and industry. This will require more groups to share the cost of protecting water quality.