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13 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980
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Record #:
29225
Author(s):
Abstract:
Connor Eagles and Lester Turnage restored the Old Farmstead at the Pitt County Fairgrounds to preserve the Eastern North Carolina heritage and to teach people about life in the past. The Old Farmstead is a group of ten buildings that include a log cabin, tobacco barn, smoke house, stables, hen house, chapel, an old farmhouse, and three museums.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p18-19, il, por
Record #:
29231
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Plantation Supper Club in Greensboro, North Carolina attracted big crowds who enjoyed its fine food, entertainment and romantic charm. Under the ownership of Fred Koury, the club operated for thirty-five years until fire destroyed it in 1976. While working with entertainers at the club, Koury helped actors, such as Andy Williams, start their careers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p49-50, por
Record #:
29229
Abstract:
This article presents six North Carolina dining establishments which represent excellence in the restaurant trade. Each is its own place, distinctive and outstanding in its own way, and together demonstrating that the realm of North Carolina extends from collards to caviar.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p38-42, por
Record #:
29228
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lloyd Remington, a chemistry professor at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and his wife Violet, have a home built underground. Hoping to use the consistency of underground temperatures to beat the high cost of energy, the natural insulation of the earth is paying off.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p30-31, por
Record #:
29227
Author(s):
Abstract:
Country singer George Hamilton IV, a Winston-Salem native, is regarded as the international ambassador of country music. In this article, Hamilton discusses how his career evolved while traveling and performing outside the United States.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p26-28, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29230
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tony Seamon’s restaurant Cap’n Tony’s is also Tony’s Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant in Morehead City, North Carolina. The place was a fish market originally in the 1930s when Tony Seamon was a charter boat skipper. As his fishing charter trips gained popularity, he expanded the market to include a restaurant.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p38-42, por
Record #:
29226
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort, North Carolina has a long history rooted in sailing and seamanship. Captain Scaduto and Captain Sinbad discuss the teaching of seamanship, life as a sailor and the traditions surrounding this lifestyle.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p22-25, por
Record #:
35902
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among the states providing syrup was North Carolina, through makers such as Franklin County’s Joe Wheeler. Making syrup entailed a refining that started with cane fodder and ended with juice cooked for the right amount of time.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p8
Record #:
35907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14
Record #:
35910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Defining this customer service marker was the word’s origin: acronym for “To Insure Promptness.” Highlighting its importance for employees was this knowledge: tips were the sole source of income for many hospitality industry employees until the late 1960s. Explaining its enduring importance was discussion of the standard tip rate. Underscoring its mutual value was ways it benefits servers and those served.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p44-45
Record #:
35908
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mentioned was Smoke to Gold, a book produced by a local junior historic club, the Skewarkians. Getting the spotlight, though, was their second literary endeavor, Weird Tales. Many of the tales told were the byproduct of club members interviewing residents of Martin County, living in towns like Bear Grass. Helping the book to live up to its name and claim were ghost stories, local superstitions, and folk medicine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p16
Record #:
35906
Abstract:
In commemoration of the State Fair, the author offered a reminiscing of this event, county style. Example highlighted was Pitt County’s version. Features such as a village exhibit and individuals like Connor Eagles making the Fairgrounds a highly recommended pit stop.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p10
Record #:
35909
Author(s):
Abstract:
Perhaps worthy of making the annals of local restaurant history was one frequented by Pitt County locals and East Carolina University students. Among its county charms were home cooked food and iced tea that may be worth writing home about.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p42