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Record #:
20262
Abstract:
This is a reprint of a paper presented at the forty-eighth annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December 3, 1948. This paper notes the launch of the Southern literary periodical \"The Southern Packet\" in June 1945 and further addresses the changes in Southern literature reflected in reviews in the Packet and as observed by the author.
Full Text:
Record #:
27495
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shannon Ravenel, the editor of Algonquin Books in Chapel Hill, talks about the state of Southern literature. The Southern writer most frequently writes about nostalgia, the passage of time, guilt, and ordinary things. While Southern fiction is often criticized for not keeping up with the times, Algonquin Books has recently received national attention on behalf of some of its authors. The publishing house was started in attempt to give a voice to talented writers who were shut out by New York publishers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 39, Sept. 26-Oct. 2 1990, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27978
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the 50th anniversary of the publication of Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, the South portrayed in by the book in the 1930s is compared with the 1980s and the 2000s. Class and race are still major issues in the South. The quality and value of the book from the perspective of an black, adult woman are shared. One conclusion drawn is that the book causes people to think of reminds us of growing up and when we recognized how the world works and the book is one that forces white individuals to examine racial and class divides in the South today.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 30, July 2010, p28-29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28405
Author(s):
Abstract:
While Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill has found success on the national level, some still stereotype the fiction it publishes. Unable to separate itself from its Southern identity, the publishing house has received criticism and often struggles to be taken seriously. Some critics believe its middle class Southerness is “cute,” but not of a high quality. No matter what the publishing house does to fight the stereotype and national success it achieves, it cannot solve the problems facing literature written in, about, and published in the South.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 34, July 1993, p11-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill celebrates its tenth anniversary this fall and the publishing house’s history is detailed. Algonquin’s founding by Louis D. Rubin, Jr. and Shannon Ravenel are described. Also detailed is the national attention and success the publishing house has achieved through its publication of Southern authors, unknown authors, and literary fiction. Finally, the publishing house’s struggles are also detailed and why they have remained successful.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 34, July 1993, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
34656
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Forstchen’s novel “One Second After” focuses on a fictional post-apocalyptic event that takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina. After an electromagnetic pulse devastates the entire United States, the small town reverts to a militaristic, patriarchal society that secludes itself from the rest of the world. Amende notes the “Southern” traditions that the town leaders continuously attribute to their success of survival: Christian political and religious beliefs, military values, and keeping away “outsiders”.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p68-77, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34657
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles W. Chestnutt was one of the few African Americans to make their way into the white publishing circuit. His work was highly critical of white abuse and power struggle of the South, which Baggett argues is the reason his work was not as far-reaching or successful as Booker T. Washington, another highly regarded African American writer at time.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p80-94, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
35907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14