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5 results for Asheville--Historic Buildings
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Record #:
19137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Slightly removed from the urban environment, Asheville's numerous hotels, sanitaria, and luxury homes shaped the city's surrounding landscape. Many of these buildings were constructed during the boom years between 1890 and 1920. Some of the more noteworthy and still preserved structures are reviewed as well as some of the famous visitors drawn to the area's beauty.
Source:
North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p20-25, il
Record #:
24011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
36986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally the William Albert Bunn family home, Ridgely Dubel had transformed it into an inn by 2013. Maintaining a sense of home and supporting the community is Dubel including amenities in each room such as a coffee/espresso machine and refrigerator filled with locally made granola and beef jerky.
Record #:
36579
Author(s):
Abstract:
A house restored to its former glory has been home in many ways since its construction by Peter Demens, co-founder of St. Petersburg, Florida. Illustrations of its illustrious history: stop-off in the social scene of the 1890s and 1910s; site for the Ida Jolly Crawley Museum of Art and Archaeology, Asheville’s first public museum.
Record #:
35907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14