NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


26 results for National Register of Historic Places--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
1768
Abstract:
North Carolina's recent entries in the National Register of Historic Places bring the state's total to 1,858. Southern surveys the recent additions and offers capsule histories of each.
Source:
Record #:
2037
Author(s):
Abstract:
Graves and cemeteries are normally not considered eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, and those that are must reflect strict criteria. North Carolina does not have a single individually listed grave in the Register.
Source:
Record #:
3644
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December, 1969, the state submitted its first property nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. On July 4, 1997, the Church of the Immaculate Conception and the Michael Ferrall Family Cemetery in Halifax became the 2,000th nomination.
Record #:
15843
Abstract:
Tarboro is a community of 10,000 people located on the Tar River in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Twenty percent of Tarboro lies within a local historic district, and almost double this amount is included on the National Register of Historic Places. Community historic preservation groups existed since the 1960s, and have succeeded due to their link with creative public/private economic revitalization projects.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Winter 1982, p18-20, f
Full Text:
Record #:
18774
Abstract:
Continuing from a previous article in the September/October 1980 edition of THE NORTH CAROLINA PRESERVATIONIST, this article details examples of North Carolina historic landmarks recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.
Record #:
18772
Abstract:
Each year, North Carolina's State Historic Preservation Office nominates select historic properties to the National Register of Historic Places. This article details this year's nominees.
Record #:
18784
Abstract:
The U.S.S. North Carolina in Wilmington has recently been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, as a significant reminder of WWII, an example of military design and technology, and as a memorial.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 24, July/Aug 1981, p3, f
Record #:
23766
Abstract:
Washburn, in Rutherford County, North Carolina, is a stately Southern Colonial house built around 1913. The home is a registered historical place.
Source:
Record #:
28003
Author(s):
Abstract:
An old school house has become an outlet for vision, hope, and music. Jay Miller renovated the former Murphey School in Durham County to be used as a place for nonprofits to gather and music to be played. The school’s history is detailed and its current renovation is detailed. The old school building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 33, August 2010, p32-33 Periodical Website
Record #:
31327
Author(s):
Abstract:
After 151 years of use and sixteen years of abandonment, the Halifax County Home has reopened as the Halifax County 4-H and Youth Day Camp. Built in 1818, the poor house was restored and added to the National Historic Register.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p9
Record #:
34829
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh’s historic neighborhood Oakwood offers a unique candlelight tour of its historic houses during Christmastime. Houses are bedecked inside and out for the holiday, allowing tourists to enjoy several architectural styles through town.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p23-26, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
37012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Emblazoned with the Lucky Strikes cigarettes symbol, it’s a reminder of a time when four fifths of the United States’ tobacco products came from Durham’s American Tobacco Company. The company still has a presence in town as the American Tobacco Campus, complete with historic buildings and courtyard.
Record #:
36988
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the two standing antebellum depots in North Carolina becomes part of history in the making as a site for weddings and transportation museum opened year around. Its architectural history is still in view in parts of the original structure intact, such as its doors and ceiling beams. Ways it has played a part of the state’s history was Confederate headquarters and stop on the Wilmington to Weldon railroad line.
Record #:
36588
Author(s):
Abstract:
The only girls’ camp listed on the National Register of Historic Places leaves a multilayered legacy. Girls participating in its three and four week programs experience traditional activities like archery along with coppersmithing. Attesting summer camps’ influence was the number of children attending Western North Carolina camps in 2010, 53,000 in the cited economic impact study. Another benefit was represented in that year’s revenue, noted in the study as 365 million statewide and 33 million locally for camps in four WNC counties.
Record #:
36579
Author(s):
Abstract:
A house restored to its former glory has been home in many ways since its construction by Peter Demens, co-founder of St. Petersburg, Florida. Illustrations of its illustrious history: stop-off in the social scene of the 1890s and 1910s; site for the Ida Jolly Crawley Museum of Art and Archaeology, Asheville’s first public museum.