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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Restaurants, lunchrooms, etc.
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Record #:
618
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a large restaurant industry, but a poor economy has affected this industry recently.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 6, June 1990, p40-45, il
Record #:
2940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brewpubs - restaurants that brew their beer to serve with meals - and microbreweries opened in the Triangle area beginning in 1988. Among the best known is Greenshields in Raleigh.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 12, Mar 1996, p17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22599
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snappy Lunch, opened in 1923, sites in Mount Airy, North Carolina and boasts the state's most famous pork chop sandwich. And with the help of the Andy Griffith Show, Snappy Lunch became a tourist destination.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p96-98, 100, 102, il Periodical Website
Record #:
29024
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over two dozen small restaurants have been featured by Guy Fieri on the Food Network Show Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives. As a result, sales at the small restaurants have spiked and continue to spike each time their show is broadcast as a rerun. Some restaurants have turned down the opportunity to be featured and some have folded under the increased exposure. The impact the show has had on North Carolina restaurants is detailed.
Source:
Record #:
29148
Abstract:
Alfredo DiPinto was born in Cerignola in southeastern Italy. His family immigrated to South Bend, Indiana where the played basketball and earned a scholarship to what is now UNC Pembroke. DiPinto's athletic background has also helped him with the restaurant game as he helps to revitalize downtown Clinton, North Carolina with traditional Italian cuisine.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p44, 46, 48, por Periodical Website
Record #:
37037
Author(s):
Abstract:
The thirty-one must-visit places are restaurants specializing in chicken—mild or spicy, served with waffles or on a bun. Included on this bucket list were Buxton Hall of Asheville, Mama Dip’s of Chapel Hill, and Spoon River Artworks and Market in Belhaven.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 11, April 2017, p132-136, 138, 140, 142-144, 146, 148 Periodical Website
Record #:
36959
Abstract:
A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
36954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dining option like drive-through are not the case for the profiled restaurants classified as hole in the wall, hard to find but worth the search. Restaurants such as El’s and Johnson’s Drive-In are considered visit worthy, since they are fond reminders of an earlier era. As for restaurants with a contemporary, culturally diverse feel, Taste of Paradise and Saigon Sandwiches and Bakery expand hole in the wall’s definition through dishes such as oxtail and bahn mi.
Source:
Record #:
35910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Defining this customer service marker was the word’s origin: acronym for “To Insure Promptness.” Highlighting its importance for employees was this knowledge: tips were the sole source of income for many hospitality industry employees until the late 1960s. Explaining its enduring importance was discussion of the standard tip rate. Underscoring its mutual value was ways it benefits servers and those served.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p44-45
Record #:
36168
Author(s):
Abstract:
Returning to her birthplace entailed coming back to a place that still felt like home. Helping to make it her hometown was familiar haunts like the long standing Bill’s Hot Dogs.
Record #:
41239
Abstract:
The author’s reflection on Davidson’s Soda Shop reveals the special place the shop had for her parents and this college town for her. From her reflection comes this hope: for future generations, there will be special places of both kinds.