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36 results for Restaurants--Raleigh
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Record #:
4459
Abstract:
When Thad Eure, Jr. and Charles Winston opened the Angus Barn in Raleigh on June 28, 1960, many thought the enterprise would be unsuccessful. The motif was modeled on Winston's grandfather's barn, and the specialty was Angus steaks, which no other restaurant was serving. Within four years the restaurant was a success. Over the years the Angus Barn had received many distinguished awards, and today it is one of Raleigh's premier restaurants.
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5353
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The Irregardless Cafe opened in Raleigh February 10, 1975. Owner Arthur Gordon says the unusual name comes from having professors in college circle in red the word in his papers, and he \"finally wanted to be able to use the word.\" Silcox-Jarrett explores what draws people year after year to this restaurant which doesn't have the best location and has a parking lot 100 yards away.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 3, Aug 2002, p128-130, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5357
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Located in Raleigh's downtown theater district, Cafe Luna is an Italian restaurant specializing in classic Tuscan fare. The restaurant opened in 1996 and turned a profit within four months. Cafe Luna focuses on the customer having a good meal, good conversation, and good wine and dessert.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 69 Issue 10, Mar 2002, p108-109, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5366
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When Clyde Cooper opened Cooper's Barbecue on East Davis Street in Raleigh in 1938, he proclaimed it \"a good place to eat.\" Sixty-four years later that's still true. Jackson takes the reader inside the restaurant which still maintains the look and feel of an old-time barbecue joint in the shadow of modern, downtown Raleigh buildings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 4, Sept 2002, p157-158, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5426
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Mo's Diner, located at the corner of Hargett and Person Streets in Raleigh, looks like a greasy spoon on the exterior, but cross the threshold, and you'll find fine dining. Pearson discusses what attracts discriminating gourmands to this restaurant.
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Record #:
6525
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Big Ed's City Market Restaurant is a Raleigh institution. Opened in 1989 in the City Market near the State Capitol, the restaurant now anchors the rejuvenated area. Owner “Big Ed” Watkins offers traditional country cooking, friendly faces, and moderate prices.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p154-155, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6966
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Gourmet editor Moreton Neal discusses the Duck and Dumpling restaurant in downtown Raleigh's Moore Square, a magnet for urbane bistros of all denominations. The establishment is co-owned by David Mao and Greg Hatem. Mao, the chef, retired after twenty-five years in the business, but says, “My fingers got itchy after a year.” Dumplings are the specialty of the house.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 2004, p82-83, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7803
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Jean Martin and her partner Steve Flaugher transformed the old Piggly Wiggly grocery at Raleigh's Five Points neighborhood into a restaurant. Called NOFO at the Pig, the restaurant opened in 2001. The upper level features a gift shop that offers a selection of gifts, gourmet goods, home items, and a deli that sells many items from the restaurant's menu. The restaurant is located on the lower level and has been a neighborhood favorite since the day it opened.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p234-236, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7926
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The search for the “Best Hot Dog” is never-ending. Brown describes three hot dog stands that he feels are strong contenders for the title. They are The Roast Grill (Raleigh); Jones Café (Clayton); and The Grocery Bag at Flowers General Store (Clayton).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p197-198, 200-201, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8468
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For seventy-six years, the culinary favorites of the Mecca Restaurant have satisfied the lunchtime crowd in downtown Raleigh. Located on East Martin Street two blocks from the state Capitol, the Mecca is in its third generation of ownership by the same family. Nick Dombalis founded the restaurant in 1930. Diners run the gamut from old friends gathering for lunch to North Carolina legislators. The jumbo hamburger is a favorite meal among the Mecca's regulars.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p181-182, 184-185, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11992
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When Thad Erue, Jr. and Charles Winston opened the Angus Barn in Raleigh on June 28, 1960, many thought the enterprise would be unsuccessful. The motif was modeled on Winston's grandfather's barn, and the specialty was Angus steaks, which no other restaurant was serving. The Angus Barn is now one of the most famous restaurants in the nation and is consistently in the top one.
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Record #:
12450
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When Thad Erue, Jr. and Charles Winston opened the Angus Barn in Raleigh on June 28, 1960, many thought the enterprise would be unsuccessful. In 2010, the restaurant celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Having served over thirteen million guests, the Angus Barn ranks in the nation's top fifty highest dollar volume eateries and is rated consistently as one of the country's one hundred best restaurants.
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Record #:
13732
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In this on-going series of articles called Expense Account Dining, Bailey describes the Angus Barn, located in Raleigh.
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16836
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Ben Crawley and Chad McIntyre operate Mr. Buzz beekeeping service. Their business services Raleigh restaurants, such as Sitti Lebanese and Big Boss Brewing, which are installing bee hives on rooftops. These hives are mutually beneficial because more hives promotes a declining bee population and the restaurant can harvest honey, typically an expensive ingredient for their menu.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 26, June 2012, p20, 22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
18476
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Thad Eure, Jr. and Charles Winston opened the Angus Barn in Raleigh on June 28, 1960. They built their restaurant to look like a big red barn, a structure which burned four years later. Many thought the business would fail, but it has prospered and is included in the list of the fifty highest-grossing independent restaurants in the country. Eure died in the late 1980s, and his daughter Van took over operations in 1991.
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