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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Nightclubs
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Record #:
27064
Abstract:
Hank Williams has served as the doorman and bouncer for a long list of Raleigh restaurants, bars, and clubs. These days, he sits in the alcoves of the new dive bar Ruby Deluxe and near the elevated threshold of Capital Club 16, checking IDs and sometimes checking attitudes. Behind the scenes, he books some of the best heavy-metal shows in the Triangle.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 12, March 2016, p15-16, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27195
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Matt Cozi is the general manager of Legends Nightclub Complex, a LGBTQ bar in Raleigh. Legends celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary on Friday with an all-night party. There will also be a moment of silence and vigil for the victims of the recent mass shooting at a gay bar in Orlando, Florida.
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Record #:
29231
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The Plantation Supper Club in Greensboro, North Carolina attracted big crowds who enjoyed its fine food, entertainment and romantic charm. Under the ownership of Fred Koury, the club operated for thirty-five years until fire destroyed it in 1976. While working with entertainers at the club, Koury helped actors, such as Andy Williams, start their careers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p49-50, por
Record #:
31337
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In the wake of the Orlando shooting, a gay writer who grew up in Florida wonders if there are any safe places left.
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Record #:
31456
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What happens when development strips away our grimy, grungy music venues? The Tremont, a no-frills all-ages music club, closes its doors after more than 20 years. With no plans to relocate the business, the Tremont’s basic cinder block building has been sold to make way for new development.
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Record #:
36291
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Built in 1899, the building once housing the Caffe Phoenix got a new lease on life, courtesy of developer magnates such as James Goodnight. Part of his vision for downtown Wilmington is it becoming the hub for tech startups and companies seeking office space in an urban area.