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1246 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
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Record #:
28786
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Richard Dobbs Spaight’s education in Ireland strongly influenced his political and philosophical beliefs which would have an effect on America’s independence from Great Britian. Being orphaned, the future North Carolina governor and signer of the Constitution was sent to Ireland for his education where the Irish were sympathetic of the developing American cause. Spaight’s time in Ireland and at the University of Glasgow prepared him to be a Revolutionary Patriot and an ally of James Madison and the Federalists at the Constitutional Convention.
Record #:
41240
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The politics of school funding during this time involved many contenting forces: black versus white; rural versus urban; six month school year versus nine; special and charter districts versus city and county. Legislation proposed included a luxury tax, the MacLean Bill, and a revenue bill. While not considered by some the fairest solution, the 1933 school bill that generated a sales tax, state control over the school system, and a uniform eight month school year was declared the sanest.
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41243
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The author explores explanations for Barnwell’s failure and Moore’s success. La Vere partly attributes it to the pine used to construct forts. Of the two, Moore was able to more effectively exploit the use of wood vulnerable to fire. As for Barnwell, insufficient provisions for his troops and fractious relations with Colonial government leaders also contributed to his lack of victory.
Record #:
41245
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Reconsidering the American South entailed examining how its culture continues to be shaped by the perception of Southerners. The author revealed that symbols like the Confederate flag, social issues such as race, and controversial figures like Josephus Daniels have positively and negatively impacted how Southerners continue to be viewed and view themselves.
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28542
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The article examines the Regulators’ and Governor William Tryon’s use of political language and rituals to support their causes and the growing crisis between Britain and the colonies in the 1760s. The author states that the Regulator movement was ultimately shaped by political interests and consequences beyond the state and influenced the American Revolution. Both the Regulators and Tryon believed that the other group did not follow the laws of the country and that this problem could be settled outside the law.
Record #:
28543
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Moravian Falls, NC's place as a hotbed for journalism in the late 19th and early 20th century is explored. The Fool-Killer, the Lash, and the Yellow Jacket were all periodicals that appealed to a wide readership and prove that the South was anything but a static intellectual environment in the 20th century. The understanding of southern journalism these publications from Wilkes County provide is explored.
Record #:
34446
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In the early 20th century, North Carolina historians and civil leaders were interested in promoting a white Anglo heritage commemorating the State’s 1587 “founding.” This interest, coinciding with the U.S. entrance into the First World War, aimed to strengthen North Carolinians’ awareness of English heritage and to justify white supremacy. Central to the public promotion of this heritage was a civic pageant, written by Frederick Koch and performed in 1920, which used Sir Walter Raleigh as a model of democracy, set in opposition to modern “threats” of anarchy and communism.
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Record #:
34447
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On 7 December, 1862, Presbyterian pastor Robert J. Graves was arrested for treason against the Confederacy. Over the next year, the case gained popularity in the media as it polarized public opinion of constitutional rights under the Confederate government. This article discusses the circumstances behind Graves’ arrest and subsequent trial.
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Record #:
34448
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Over the course of the 18th century, the native North Carolina Chowan population adopted European practices and sold their allocated reservation lands to conform and survive in the British colony. These actions led to their reclassification from “Indians” to “Colored People” by colonial officials, who also assumed there was a loss of cultural identity. Contemporary writers incorrectly believed the Chowans no longer existed as a political or cultural entity, however an examination of archival and oral histories indicates that the Chowan people have maintained their cultural identity. Furthermore, their colonial racial reclassification is indicative of attitudes towards race and identity formation in the 18th century.
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Record #:
34449
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On December 24, 1864 the Union launched the largest American naval bombardment to date against forces at Fort Fisher in an attempt to seal the port of Wilmington. While successful in landing troops near the Fort, the expedition ultimately failed. Historically, Union General Benjamin Butler was blamed for the military failure. In the article, the author argues that it was not only Butler, but personal politics between Union commanders, that doomed their attempt to take Fort Fisher.
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Record #:
34450
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North Carolina civil rights lawyer John Wheeler was an advocate for equal employment opportunity in government positions and the advancement of Black Americans. His work directly influenced national employment legislation, and Wheeler himself served on various state and national committees. Despite his involvement in national civil rights, Wheeler remains elusive in modern historical studies. This article discusses Wheeler’s background and career as a banker, lawyer, and civil rights advocate, emphasizing his contributions to the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity.
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Record #:
34453
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Slaves and maroon communities were perceived as a threat to white property in Eastern North Carolina during the antebellum era. While slaves did have legal access to firearms during the colonial period, this access was revoked following the 1831 Nat Turner Rebellion in Virginia. This article discusses the use of black firearm laws as a means of protecting white property and mitigating the perceived black threat.
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Record #:
34451
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Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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Record #:
34452
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In 1754, Captain Neil Campbell organized a singular voyage for Scottish immigrants looking to settle in the New World. This article discusses their emigration to the Cape Fear region and resulting settlement using historic records, maps, and written histories.
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Record #:
23931
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During the age of Jim Crow, African Americans were denied access to shared public places, including leisure spaces. This article examines the establishment of Hammocks Beach as a blacks-only beach, while simultaneously highlighting the larger African American struggle for social freedom in North Carolina and challenging the progressive image of the state regarding integration.
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