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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for "Outer Banks--Culture"
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Record #:
40423
Author(s):
Abstract:
Generations of Outer Bank locals can attest to the enduring impact North Carolina Inlets have on their lifeway. They have also been witness to how these watery spaces between land and sea have environmentally and ecologically impacted the development of this region.
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Record #:
40684
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke’s cultural traditions are worth keeping alive, as the author proved in her description of one of its community symbols. She also illustrated this through James Barrie Gaskill, whose life reflected the Outer Banks’ identity, unique to the rest of the state.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 51 Issue 7, July 2019, p14-16
Record #:
36167
Abstract:
The connection between a well known area of the Outer Banks and Beaufort County's capital was created physically. For many decades, ferries like the Bessie Virginia transported good between “Little Washington” and area known for its connection to Roanoke’s lost colony. It was also created emotionally, in the bonds between people interdependent on each other for survival.
Record #:
41254
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks’ association with aircraft can also be attributed to David Driskill. In fact, from his ferrying of provisions, parcels, pay, and people, he became synonymous with flight for generations of locals. Acknowledgment of his two decades’ plus of service is attested in an article from another local famed figure, Aycock Brown, and a monument, erected after his death in a plane crash in 1952.
Record #:
25107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Citizens of the villages on the barrier islands of North Carolina have spoken a distinctive English dialect not found outside of the Outer Banks. Dr. Walt Wolfram, a professor at NC State and researcher of North Carolina dialects, describes the Outer Banks brogue and highlights the importance of documenting it for future generations.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p10-11, il, por, map
Record #:
28843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Podolak, a former cardiologist at the University of North Carolina medical school, and his wife Tina have homes in Buxton, North Carolina and Denver, Colorado. The Podolaks reflect on their experiences living in the Outer Banks and memories of the diverse local culture.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 13 Issue 5, July 2012, p32-35, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
19496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras native and author Tom Carlson paints a splendid picture of the people, issues, and ideas of the Outer Banks in his book \"Hatteras Blues: A Story from the Edge of America.\" During the course of the book, Carlson conveys the uniqueness of culture and character found on the Outer Banks.
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Record #:
36029
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glimpses of the past were perhaps seen most clearly in this collection of photos. One was a reminder of when the ferry was the only source of transport for humans and cargo. Others were reminders of businesses long since gone out of business, as well as buildings still standing. Most the photos, though, attested the importance of waterways around the Island, whether the creek familiarly known as the “Slash,” Core Sound, or Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p30-39
Record #:
36022
Abstract:
A library’s archives typically contain donations of letters and documents. For Hatteras Island’s Library, a 125 year old quilt reflected what the town’s culture perceived as preservation worthy. Current creators of these quilts, in discussing the tradition of quilt-making, also proved that the “Human Library” concept is not so new.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p20-21
Record #:
36024
Abstract:
Maude White, whose career history included postal employee and boarding house owner, kept memories of Buxton School alive. Included in her recollections was Charlie Gray, well known for his accomplishments in the classroom and out. Also mentioned by this teacher of thirty-four years was an instructor not well known for classroom management.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p38-41
Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
36004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
35998
Abstract:
Among Mrs. Cynthia Rollinson’s recollections of life were the lives she helped delivered as a midwife. As for life from decades ago, she could attest to a time when homes had ice boxes instead of refrigerators. She could also attest to a way Hatteras Island seemed futuristic, even in its dependency on kerosene as a light source: it had windmills.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35994
Author(s):
Abstract:
Toys common during her great grandmother’s childhood were rag dolls for girls and carved boats for boys. These objects had the role toys typically play in any culture: to prepare children for anticipated gender roles to take on as adults. As to another cultural aspect revealed, the toys reflected a time perhaps regarded as simpler by many younger generations.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p6-7