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12 results for Toys
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Record #:
5879
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Prunkl discusses the Toy Museum at Old Salem in Winston-Salem. The museum, the vision of Tom Gray and his mother, Anne Gray, opened in November 2002. The Grays donated their 4,000-piece toy collection, with items dating from 225 A.D. to 1925, for auction. The $250,000 raised purchased 95 percent of the museum's collection, which features toys children played with from the state's earliest settlements to the early 20th century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 1, June 2003, p138-142, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6243
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Luther Ashby of Hudson makes a line of Appalachian folk toys whose origins date back three or four hundred years, their designs copied, improved upon, and passed on to the next generation. His business, Pioneer Folk Toys, produces 24 items, including flipper-dingers and Gee-Haw Whimmydiddles.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 7, Dec 2003, p31-32, 34, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7257
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Toymaker Harold Garrison hand-carves old-time toys, like the hillbilly yo-yo and the gee haw whimmy diddle. Garrison is in his eighty-second year, stands 6'10,” and still lives at his old homeplace in Weaverville. His carving titled “Government Machines” earned him a spot in the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p74-77, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8473
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The Old Salem Toy Museum in Winston-Salem was founded in 2002 by Tom Gray and his mother, Anne Gray. The museum is housed in the Frank L. Horton Museum Center, and the thousands of toys in the collection span a period of 1,700 years. One of the rare items in the museum is a paint set George Washington gave his step-granddaughter in 1793 for her fourteenth birthday. Gray had to outbid the staff at Mount Vernon for the toy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p9, por
Record #:
8821
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Children raised during the Great Depression were sometimes forced to play with home-made toys. That did not matter to them, or course, as home-made toys can be just as much fun as those bought at a store. Today, grandparents raised during the depression years can pass along their knowledge of home-made toys to their grandchildren, as the author did when his young granddaughter made a recent week-long visit. One such depression era toy is the shoebox streetcar. Made out of a shoebox, children can cut out windows, attach a string, and light a candle inside to create a night-time toy that glows in the dark. Children wishing to grow tall like adults may want to create tin-can stilts. These stilts are not as dangerous as those used in the circus, but they still make children feel ten-feet tall. Tying a string to two halves old oatmeal boxes creates a toy telephone while a candle lantern makes for a fun night-time exploration. These toys are not only fun for children, but also teach them a history lesson about life during the Great Depression.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983, p24-26, por
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Record #:
11343
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Twenty years ago Jack Guy started reviving the art of making folk toys, like a gee haw whimmy diddle or flipper dingers. Most of the toys date back 200 years. He sold at first to tourists, but the demand became so great that he hired mountains folks to carve the toys. By 1971, RTC Industries was distributing the toys nationally. Blue Ridge Cottage Industries, Inc., of Boone, which markets Jack Guy Folk Toys nationwide, succeeded it.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 32 Issue 5, May 1974, p46-48, il, por
Record #:
13129
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The Toy House was built in 1924 as home for the Tyron Toymakers and Woodcarvers, a project started by Eleanor Vance and Charlotte Yale, who wanted to help the native population through development of their crafts. The Toy House sold unusual carved furniture, frames, and wooden toys. A fire later destroyed tools, patterns, and supplies, leaving the house empty and waiting. The Guilberts of Boston, sold their home in suburban New England to reopen the Toy House and begin the process again of making over fifty different toys, ideas coming from many sources including adult customers memories.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Nov 1955, p13, f
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Record #:
16386
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One of the most popular handicrafts passed down through the ages is that of making toys for children. One such popular toy is the whooey stick--a notched stick when vigorously rubbed by another causes a propeller to turn.
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Record #:
27000
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Melinda Ruley, an Independent author, spent eight hours in search of the perfect toy for Christmas. She visited the Crabtree Valley Mall in Raleigh, K&K Toys, Toys R Us, and the Play House in Durham. From her observations, Melinda concluded that the perfect toy is something that puts children at the center of the universe where they know they belong.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 24, Dec 16-Jan 11 1988, p13-15, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22719
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From custom bicycles and wrestling memorabilia, to Simpsons memorabilia and lava lamps, Charlotte, North Carolina has some premier collections of action figures, unique art, and childhood memories.
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Record #:
35994
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Toys common during her great grandmother’s childhood were rag dolls for girls and carved boats for boys. These objects had the role toys typically play in any culture: to prepare children for anticipated gender roles to take on as adults. As to another cultural aspect revealed, the toys reflected a time perhaps regarded as simpler by many younger generations.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p6-7
Record #:
36330
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Growing up in a mill town, the mill provided lots of spare parts to make everyday items out of. Gear wheel wagons were a particular favorite, but other toys included yarn balls, rubber guns, and jump ropes.
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