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53 results for "Gardens and gardening"
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Record #:
34825
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Biltmore Estates in Asheville, North Carolina has a long history of stunning landscaping and gardens. Garden designer Clare Whittington discusses their procedure for planning out the gardens that surround the massive 8,000 acre estate, and how home gardeners can use the same tools.
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Record #:
35215
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Advice from Dianna Troyner for individuals hopeful for green thumb status included how to design a garden. Taken into account is realism, represented in tips such as grow only what is necessary. As for idealism, an example of advice was to account for fanciful form as well as farm function.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Mar 2017, p18-19
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Record #:
36191
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Reuse, recycle, and renew are buzz words generated by the ongoing environmental crisis. Ways wine bottles can be used after the party ends are ecologically conscious, creative, and practical. Uses included plant labels, row covers securers, and floral wreath additions.
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Record #:
36193
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The cover alluded to is mulch, produced naturally to promote wild plant growth. Materials recommended for creating mulch are wood bark/chips, leaves, and straw or hay. Additional incentive to use mulch in gardens were the downside of not having mulch as a natural protectant for plants.
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Record #:
36192
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With the long established health hazards of smoking, it may seem ironic that tobacco would be included with Teosinte, Chiltepin Pepper, and a variety of Petunia as good garden additions. The beauty of its flowers and natural insecticide may make it easier to understand why tobacco is not too far out to consider.
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Record #:
36196
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The particular type of worm discussed, compost, can create compost through a process known as vermiculture. Encouraging gardeners to keep organic waste from landfills is its five benefits: increasing water holding capacity and porosity; improving texture; reducing erosion; and impact on plant growth and yields. Additional incentive to engage in vermiculture is this EPA’s statistic: between 55-65% of residential waste is thrown away, much of which is organic.
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Record #:
36201
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The presence of pollinators is of increased concern for scientists, gardeners, and farmers, due to decreased pollinator populations worldwide. For a pollinator friendly garden, the author recommended flowers preferable to pollinators such as Passion vine, Milkweed, Coneflower, and Dahlia. Other factors to consider are a protective environment and ample water sources.
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Record #:
36199
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This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
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Record #:
36202
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John Tradescant the Younger is credited for finding plants such as the Virginia Creeper and Spiderwort, with the latter having his contribution reflected in its Latin name, Tradescantia virginiana. Along with being a popular garden plant, Spiderwort can be found in abandoned farms and homesteads, a testament to their former importance in agrarian life.
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Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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Record #:
36195
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For gardeners seeking green thumb level success, the author offered information types of plants: open pollinated; hybrid; and genetically modified organism. She discussed each type’s characteristics and how OPs, hybrids, and GMOs can affect a garden’s productivity.
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Record #:
36200
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Essential to garden growth are pollinators, or creatures involved in plant pollination. Examples of insect pollinators are the mason bee and flower fly. Mammal pollinators include hummingbirds. To keep them replenishing the plant supply, the author suggested diversifying the types of flowers by type and shape.
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Record #:
36194
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DE Powder is the shortened version of diatomaceous earth, a recommended type of fertilizer. It, as fossilized remains, prove that usefulness can long outlive lifespan.
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Record #:
36204
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Environmental disasters and habitat destruction have encouraged some homeowners to open up their yards to house affected wildlife, especially pollinators, through organic landscaping and wildlife- friendly food sources. Growth factors include region and hardiness. For food, the author recommends trees such as the Mulberry and Dogwood and shrubs such as Holly. Examples of plants fit for consumption include honeysuckle and milkweed.
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Record #:
36210
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Form follows function, a phrase associated with design, can be associated with gardening as well. Examples of conditions that will affect the form of the plant are amount and quality of light, water, and soil nutrients. Such factors can also impact the forms noted by the author: foundation planting, specimen plant, color or fragrance, or fun. Other factors that may impact form are personal preference and the relationship of one plant to another.
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