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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Homesteads
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Record #:
16307
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1866 a small unpretentious farmhouse was built in the Quaker community of Snow Camp, North Carolina. It taking a closer look at this home and its community, Osborn focuses on the form, construction, and use of the Hugh Dixon homestead through time and its use as an expression of changing values, perceptions, and ways of life.
Record #:
23716
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author tells of his upbringing outside Bryson City. His family was self-sustainable on a homestead, a type of lifestyle that seems to be gaining popularity today. The author argues the back-to-the-land movement is not a fad but an enduring lifestyle.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24868
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lukas Burgher and Laura Fieselman explore former homesteads in Walnut, NC and, using photographs, discover the story the homestead has to tell. Fieselman reveals the story the homestead tells her.
Record #:
34847
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hardscrabble Hollow Farm in Rutherford County is the home of the McDermott family. Having left behind the city life for their new country farm, they raise chickens, goats, bees, and crops to sustain their lives during retirement. They blog about their experiences on the farm and sell their excess harvest to the community.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 10, March 2018, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Homes gained value in ways that couldn’t be defined by the year of construction or a place in a historical house directory. For the author, there’s no place like home was proven in porches as well as peepholes, hand rived shingles as well as shake roofs. From these discoveries, one can gain a new perspective on the old days.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p27
Subject(s):
Record #:
35864
Author(s):
Abstract:
The house Wiseman grew up in was made with hand saw lumber, making it drafty and prone to creaking in rough weather. The homestead included acres of farm land and pastures for cattle, sheep, and horses, along with areas for hogs and beekeeping.
Subject(s):
Record #:
36199
Author(s):
Abstract:
This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
Source:
Record #:
38132
Author(s):
Abstract:
History in terms of town life and family homestead, otherwise hidden away in Washington County, has been offered renown. Maintained on donations since the last dwellers’ deaths in the 1970s, the Davenport House offers glimpses of late 18th-century life through artifacts of daily living from that time period such as open hearth and corn crib.