NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Loewer, Peter
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
17370
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edwin Gonzalez has a garden different from most gardeners. His is located on the rooftop of the 14-story Battery Park apartment building which was built in 1924 in downtown Asheville. Gonzalez grew up in Puerto Rico and was involved in gardening on the family farm. He received over $300 in plant aid from Project EMMA--Eat better, Move More, Age well--an organization that seeks to increase wellness and health opportunities for participants in the Council on Aging of Buncombe County.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p50-54, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
17376
Author(s):
Abstract:
This plant was first identified in 1784 by Swedish naturalist Peter Thunberg and later named for Dutch physician and botanist Martin Houttuyu. It is a plant of many names. Loewer describes its characteristics and what to watch out for if used as ground cover.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
17396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loewer discusses the history of tarragon, a plant that the Greeks described as far back as 500 B.C., and the number of ways it has been used through the ages up to the present.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
17410
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loewer describes the characteristics of the China fir and its history. The first was first collected in 1701 by Dr. James Cunningham, an English surgeon and avid plant collector, but it would be another hundred years before it was brought to England. It is an unusual and rare conifer in the North Carolina mountains, but will survive and flourish.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
17583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loewer recommends five plants that Carolina gardeners can use to brighten up their gardens in the twilight hours--Angel's Trumpets, Moonflowers, Woodland Tobacco, Vining Petunia, and Cereus.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21847
Author(s):
Abstract:
The finding of a statue of this saint in Wing Haven Gardens in Charlotte piqued Loewer's interest, especially the inscription beneath it--the Patron Saint of Gardeners. Loewer recounts what his research uncovered about this Irish monk who lived during the 600s.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Apr 2014, p22, 24, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
34824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville resident Peter Loewer keeps a garden fit for western North Carolina’s cool climate. During the summer of 2016, however, the area was hit with high temperatures and little rainfall. Following the season, Loewer assessed his garden and others in the area to determine which plants had high levels of heat resilience. He found that several grasses faired well, as did his tropical annuals. Plants intended to attract insect life, too, survived the summer heat.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
34817
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville resident Dana Irwin’s garden was inspired by Jean Fragonard’s painting, The Swing. After purchasing the property in the 1990s, Irwin worked with a local landscaper to grow North Carolina wildflowers. As pathways were placed between the different beds, Irwin wanted to incorporate a swing into the outdoor area. Interested in Fragonard’s work, Irwin hired a local friend to design and build the swing.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 2, March 2016, p56-60, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
36202
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Tradescant the Younger is credited for finding plants such as the Virginia Creeper and Spiderwort, with the latter having his contribution reflected in its Latin name, Tradescantia virginiana. Along with being a popular garden plant, Spiderwort can be found in abandoned farms and homesteads, a testament to their former importance in agrarian life.
Source:
Record #:
23732
Abstract:
Loewer highlights four gardeners in Western North Carolina who transform their work into art.
Source:
Subject(s):