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9 results for Gardens--Asheville
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Record #:
1327
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Art gallery owner John Cram restored and redesigned Kenilworth Garden in Asheville, a series of twenty-three theme gardens, each suited to its topography, nestled in a wooded cove at the edge of a man-made lake.
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North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 3, June 1993, p54-59, por
Record #:
7141
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The North Carolina Arboretum, located on the outskirts of Asheville, contains a unique garden called the Heritage Garden. The garden contains plants that the early Appalachian settlers used to create and enhance the necessities of life. Broomcorn was used by Indians, settlers, and now present-day artisans to make brooms. Marigolds, yarrow, and butterfly weed were sources for natural fabric dyeing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p152-155, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15124
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Craggy Gardens, said to be the largest and loftiest flower gardens in the world, are to become predominant background for western North Carolina future rhododendron festivals. Craggy Gardens is semi-public property, belonging to the United States government and the city of Asheville. While Craggy Gardens have been a mecca for many years for hardy beauty lovers who could scale the deep heights of Craggy Dome, it was not until 1933 that a motor road to the crest allowed more visitors to enjoy the flowers and the view.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 42, Mar 1941, p1, 21
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Record #:
15302
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In western North Carolina an azalea garden is being created on Biltmore Estate near Asheville. It is a fitting memorial to Chauncey Delos Beadle, superintendent of the estate for fifty years and who executed the extensive landscaping pattern drafted by the architect, Frederick Law Olmstead.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 52, May 1940, p22
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Record #:
17368
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Chase describes the evolution of Curve Studios and Garden which is located close to the French Broad River in Asheville's River Arts District. The garden is bordered with elegant flowerbeds and enhanced with quiet seating areas and lots of sculpture. Patty Torno owns the Curve Studios complex and tends the garden in all the seasons.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p30-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22221
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\"Truly magnificent gardens need time and attention to flourish--coaxed and nurtured by guiding hands and verdant vision.\" Milner takes readers on a walk through Peter and Jasmin Gentling's garden, called Blue Briar Garden located on Sunset Mountain in Asheville. They have cultivated it over the last forty years. The garden serves as a backdrop to their home, historic Blue Briar Cottage, built in 1906 and purchased by them in 1971.
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Record #:
34824
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Asheville resident Peter Loewer keeps a garden fit for western North Carolina’s cool climate. During the summer of 2016, however, the area was hit with high temperatures and little rainfall. Following the season, Loewer assessed his garden and others in the area to determine which plants had high levels of heat resilience. He found that several grasses faired well, as did his tropical annuals. Plants intended to attract insect life, too, survived the summer heat.
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Record #:
34822
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Nichole Lachance, of Asheville, is a landscape designer who maintains her own gardens with minimal fuss. Her gardens emphasize low-key maintenance; most of the plants are kept small on purpose. To make the most of her garden, she shopped for the necessary characteristics, not plant species. For example, she noted environmental conditions in her yard such as sun, moisture, area available and chose plants that fit those growing requirements.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 7, September 2016, p56-59, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34817
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Abstract:
Asheville resident Dana Irwin’s garden was inspired by Jean Fragonard’s painting, The Swing. After purchasing the property in the 1990s, Irwin worked with a local landscaper to grow North Carolina wildflowers. As pathways were placed between the different beds, Irwin wanted to incorporate a swing into the outdoor area. Interested in Fragonard’s work, Irwin hired a local friend to design and build the swing.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 2, March 2016, p56-60, il, por Periodical Website
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