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10 results for Tar Heel Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979
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Record #:
6529
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lee recounts the history of Blowing Rock from its humble beginnings as a farm community in the early 1800s to its present-day status as a mecca for tourists and vacationers. A number of famous people have visited there, including Pearl Buck and Margaret Mitchell, and Presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, and Dwight Eisenhower. The town takes its name from a rocky cliff which overlooks John's River Gorge 3,000 feet below and from the Indian legend about the rock.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p20-22, 31, il, map
Record #:
6530
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sessoms profiles Kristi Overton of Greenville, who, at the tender age of nine years, is making her mark in professional waterskiing. She started on skis at the age of four and a half, could slalom (one ski) at five, and was on trick skis at six. In 1978, as the youngest competitor ever in the Nationals, she won fourth place honors behind the Junior Girls Champion, who was an experienced skier three years older than Overton.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p45, il
Record #:
35750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s discussion of NC lakes reflected their importance as a source of recreation such as fishing and swimming, as well as backdrops for camping and picnicking. Examples were size (the Kerr Reservoir, fifty thousand acres), type (natural lakes are only in the Coastal Plain), and depth (Mattamuskeet, its greatest depth five feet). Discussed also were eastern lakes’ three groupings (peninsula between Pamlico River and Albemarle Sound; Pocosin slough between New Bern and Bogue Sound; in Columbus and Bladen county).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p23-24
Record #:
35751
Author(s):
Abstract:
References to Hoover revealed time (the Great Depression). Details such as the favorite pastime of the main character’s father (cockfighting) betrayed the setting (a family farm in a small town). These details make the story, dedicated to Erskine Caldwell, seem unrelatable for modern, urban audiences. The conflict between the main character’s parents on how to assure that he (Wesley) becomes a decent adult, however, may be perceived as a timeless issue.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p25-26, 37, 55
Record #:
35749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Olive’s analysis of how crimes were handled in the US during the nineteenth century revealed that standards were more different than similar. For example, the punishment for blasphemy was jail time and a fine. The punishment for being a common scold (or nagging woman) was placement on a ducking stool and plunging into water. Such punishments revealed that socio-cultural standards were much stricter as well as often double standard.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p14-15
Record #:
35753
Author(s):
Abstract:
The title, referring to mixed drinks, hinted the author’s occupation: bartender. As for other details disclosing daily life on the other side of the counter, they asserted Morrow’s claim that the average barkeep becomes an amateur psychologist and sociologist through his/her dealings with customers from all walks of life.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p32-33
Record #:
35752
Author(s):
Abstract:
The interview with this Massachusetts native revealed his beliefs about the importance of and teaching approach for poetry. Heffernan also discussed his life as a poet in North Carolina, which he asserted was the “most literary state in the country.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p28-29, 48
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35754
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fragile wilderness could be found in Merchants Millpond State Park, on the southern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. Despite its fragility, it had an important place and long history in the area. During the nineteenth century, the Millpond contained a gristmill, wheat mill, and sawmill. By the twentieth century, it had become the largest trading center in Gates County. Its present purpose: a viable habitat for animals such as river otters and plant species such as the water violet. As for the State Park’s benefits to humans, that included activities such as camping and backpacking, drawing and guided tours.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p34-35
Record #:
35755
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group of Gaston artists was responsible for the discovery of this town’s past, represented in a tactile sense through nine historic buildings. That discovery spurred the development of a project showcasing the town’s textile history. It included a hands on exhibit for children and guided tour through historic buildings such as the Rhyne Building and Wilson-Spargo House. As for future plans inspired by this project, they included restoring the historic feel through installing gas lamps and offering buggy rides. Contained were photos of the buildings that made Dallas the second largest bearer of historic buildings in the state (Salem is number one).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p40-41