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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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164 results for "North Carolina Naturalist"
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Record #:
39511
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Serving as a tour guide for North Carolina’s three regions, the author advises for these areas the best places to visit, best times of the year to visit, and special considerations to take when visiting. Regarded must see areas included Pocosin Lakes and Mattamuskeet Wildlife Refuges; Swift Creek Bluffs and Johnston Mill Nature Preserves; Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
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Record #:
39512
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Among the things North Carolina Natural Museum’s staff voted as the best from its Nature Exploration Center and Nature Research Center: Diving Pelican, Coastal Hall Exhibit; Mountains to the Sea; Maine Lobster, Arthropod Zoo; Window on Animal Health; Micro World iLab; and Touchable Meteorites.
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Record #:
27813
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Weather has always connected people, for weather is one of the strongest natural forces in human lives. Many people without scientific backgrounds are making discoveries, including David Herring, who has developed his own home weather station. This article is an excerpt from Dr. Caren Cooper’s new book, “Citizen Science: How Ordinary People Are Changing the Face of Discovery.”
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2017, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
27812
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The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences offers pelagic birding trips. During a trip last year, participants observed and learned more about Gannets, birds who breed in the Artic but migrate as far south as North Carolina in the winter.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2017, p2-3, il
Record #:
29170
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Moon jellyfish found in centers all over the country derive from a group of polyps received from Charlotte's Discovery Place in 2012. For example, in the Micro World iLab, these jellyfish are then bred through time-consuming processes and sent again to other centers for research and public outreach.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Summer 2017, p2-3, por
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Record #:
29171
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North Carolina is a place for the pursuit of hoppy-ness in the form of beer. Brewers use unique combinations of yeast, honey, barley, and malt to create local flavors. The unique creations can be sampled at the fourth annual Natural Selections event at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Summer 2017, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
29173
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A celestial display exclusive to the United States--a total solar eclipse--will cross 14 states, including North Carolina, August 2017. North Carolinians have not had an experience like this since the 1970s, and large eclipse like this over North America will not occur again until 2024.
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Record #:
29172
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In September, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences celebrates the 21st annual Bugfest. This year will highlight the unique dragonfly species present throughout North Carolina.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Summer 2017, p6, por
Record #:
34618
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This spring, Raleigh and the greater Triangle region competed in the nationwide event called City Nature Challenge, coming in sixth place. Competitors took pictures all over the city of animals and plants in order to determine what metropolitan area had the most wildlife. This collection, while a fun competition, also builds a baseline for species occurrence and diversity.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Spring 2017, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
34619
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Folklore has often cast the black cat, screech owl, and doodlebug in a bad light. In Frank C. Brown’s books “The Folklore of North Carolina”, he postulates that these creatures are omens of bad luck. This article explores these native North Carolina species, how they got reputations as bad omens, and where to find them in the state.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2017, p2-3, il
Record #:
35344
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This collection contained nearly 600 photographs, some labeled, others not, of fossil invertebrate specimens. Paul Brinkman believed the discovery of this collection compiled in the late nineteenth century could contribute to new research ventures in paleontology.
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Record #:
35343
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Kelcee L. Smith and Annmarie Fearing’s Summer 2017 research study's goal: to understand how the factor of genetic diversity could have contributed to the sawfish’s declining population. With a greater understanding, the authors hope to contribute to this creature’s conservation.
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Record #:
35342
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Highlighted by Cindy Lincoln was epizoochory, aka “hitchhikers,” seeds and fruits that attach themselves to other living things. As to why hitchhikers such as the profiled Southern Sandbur have this feature, she explained that it’s to disperse seeds. Another similarity noted was the areas hitchhikers habituate: where humans and other mobile creatures haunt.
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Record #:
35339
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Matt Ziher proposed that biomimicry, or this creature’s biologically inspired design, played a pivotal role in its survival. Characteristics of biomimicry noted were survival tactics for the ants' construction of shelter, gathering of food supply, avoidance of disease, and rearing of offspring
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Record #:
35341
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Outbreaks of profiled viruses such as Ebola, Zika, or Marburg will be contained with the application of medical technology. How effectively medical treatments and tools can be applied, according to Alex Dornburg, depends on the populations’ time and resources.
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