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29 results for Wineries
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Record #:
16775
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Ensrud, Metro Magazine's Wine Editor, discusses the wine scene in North Carolina, which is developing into a major wine region with top-flight products, vineyards, and a growing reputation.
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Record #:
22041
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Spencer discusses the beer and wine industry in the state, as well as new emerging distilleries. The state has strict laws that liquor cannot flow as freely as beer and wine. The state also has a reputation for making illegal moonshine, but anyone with the right permits can distil liquor. Although Prohibition repeal was decades ago, the state's first legal distillery did not open till ten years ago. Now there are 14 distilleries in North Carolina, compared to 146 wineries and 82 breweries.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2014, p22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22487
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Chris Choinski's B&C Winery, a Waynesville wine-crafting business, began as a hobby and now not only sells handcrafted wines, but offers help to others interested in home brewing.
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Record #:
23152
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Bay Sire Winery, Bistro & Ale is an upscale restaurant and winery in Jackson, North Carolina. Owner and developer, Jemma Cox, does not harvest her own grapes, but rather purchases them from all over the world, and then ferments and bottles wine under the Bay Sire label. The Bay Sire also serves delicious food and ale.
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Record #:
24206
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Duplin Winery is a family operated business in Duplin County. The author discusses the history of how it became the biggest winery in the Southeast.
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Record #:
24531
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Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill, North Carolina produces a wine that is made entirely from the juice of grapes native to the state. This article presents the new winery and how they produce wine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p12-14, il
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Record #:
27410
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There are now 34 wineries in Western North Carolina located across 6 districts, which include Buncombe County, Henderson, & Polk Counties, and other more mountainous areas of western North Carolina. There are tours and tastings available for the various wineries.
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Record #:
29657
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North Carolina is now one of the best places in the country to enjoy wine. As the wine industry has grown since 2000 with double the acres of grape vines and triple the wineries, wine tourism has also grown. An estimated 800,000 tourists come to North Carolina for the wine each year, with an economic impact of $813 million.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p52-53, por
Record #:
31091
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The number of wineries across North Carolina has more than tripled over the past ten years, with half a dozen new ones scheduled to open in 2004, bringing the total to thirty-six. This article provides information on wineries, wine tours and festivals throughout North Carolina. Ten of the wineries and vineyards are located along the Yadkin Valley Wine Trail, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, Apr 2004, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
31252
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From the Mother Vine to the Biltmore to the backyard, North Carolina grapes have turned into fine wine for centuries. North Carolina is now referred to as “The Variety Vineland” because of the diversity of grapes that can be grown here. This article discusses the state’s history of wine making and highlights notable vineyards, wineries and winemakers.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 9, Sept 2000, p24-25, il, por
Record #:
34954
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Pender County, North Carolina hosts a small vineyard called Bannerman Vineyard and Winery. A small operation of 18-acres, the winery creates only muscadine wines and juices, but still have created a loyal following of fans, some as far away as Maryland and Ohio.
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Record #:
34982
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In 2005, Treehouse Vineyards settled in Monroe, North Carolina. Not only do they make award-winning wine, but they also offer a unique way to view the vineyard: from a treehouse. Since opening to the public in 2010, owners Phil and Dianne Nordan have created three different treehouses that can be rented for events and parties.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p48-50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35776
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Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28
Record #:
41180
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While Thanksgiving may primarily revolve around food and the spirit of giving, the wines should also fit into the theme. In the spirit of Thanksgiving, purchase wines that give back to the community in the forms of wineries that give a portion of their proceeds to various charity or nonprofit groups.
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