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25 results for "Carteret County--Social life and customs"
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Record #:
35970
Author(s):
Abstract:
One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23
Record #:
34654
Author(s):
Abstract:
Various autograph books are housed in the Carteret County Historical Society. The earliest, dating to the 1860s, contains inscriptions from friends and family. Autograph books were a popular pastime for young people and often express their sentiments towards peers.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p18, il
Record #:
34488
Author(s):
Abstract:
Williamson details a letter from Mr. Daniel Bryan Dickinson to the County Superintendent for school services rendered from 1883. The original letter is included with Williamson’s notes.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p8
Record #:
34531
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brinson recalls his childhood friendship with a neighbor who lived at the boarding house across the street. Topics addressed include play, entertainment, and youth impressions of the Korean War.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 3, Summer 1994, p10-11
Record #:
34483
Author(s):
Abstract:
In fall 1992, the Carteret County Historical Society celebrated their twenty first birthday. This article documents the festivities and presents a brief overview of the society, including leadership, programs, publications, and the associated museum.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p, il, por
Record #:
34728
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses the practice of hog killing as remembered by the author. An annual event that happened between Thanksgiving and early January, community members would gather to butcher and process hogs raised on local farms. The author discusses butchery practices and some of the recipes used by their family. Many of the cuts of meat required additional preservation including salting, drying, smoking, or canning.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p11-13, il
Record #:
34754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community stores were a tradition in 20th century Carteret County. Carrying everything from food stuffs to household items, every store kept personalized accounts for each family. The author recalls each of the nine stores selling specialty items—one is remembered as carrying fresh farm produce, for example, while another sold handmade Moon Pies. Kib’s Store, in particular, was memorable due to it’s shotgun architectural style and distinctive lean.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p12-13, il
Record #:
34785
Author(s):
Abstract:
The annual Lukens homecoming is held to remember the small community of Lukens in Carteret County. First settled during the 18th century, town residents began leaving following extensive damage from the 1933 hurricane. Today, Lukens descendants and family members return once a year to share histories of the community. Descriptions of the town and residents are given by those present. A trip to Lukens follows the remembrances. Today, some of the Lukens structures are still standing in South River, North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p7-8, il
Record #:
34627
Abstract:
This article discusses daily life in Bogue Banks during the late 19th century. The author uses examples from her childhood to address local construction practices, food preparation, agriculture, and daily life. The theme of community and family is evident throughout the narrative and the author often depicts a self-reliant life on the Outer Banks. As local infrastructure improved, small communities usually gained a Church first followed by a school house. After the turn of the century, fishing became a predominant source of income in Salter Path for consumption in Morehead City. The narrative ends with a description of changing life in the 1920s.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p6-16, il, map
Record #:
34490
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lucas details growing up in Morehead City during the 1930s. She addresses various aspects of daily life including household chores, food preparation, and livestock. There are also personal recollections of the 1933 hurricane.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p14-17
Record #:
34496
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the third installation of childhood anecdotes, Lucas recalls attending church services with her family, home medical treatment, entertainment; employment; local community members; and holiday traditions. Food and traditions are central to many of the memories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Summer 1993, p16-19
Record #:
35167
Author(s):
Abstract:
A retelling of Midsummer Eve ritualistic practices done by Mrs. Deyo in her youth. These practices were supposed to give clues as to whom the girls would marry.
Record #:
36188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The capital of Carteret County has had a long history in the Crystal Coast. Dubbed Fish Town in the early 1700s, the town received its next moniker from John Motley Morehead in the 1850s. Incorporated as Morehead City in 1861, the town lives up to its original identity through its famous Blue Marlin Tournament, Seafood Festival, and Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant.
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Record #:
24498
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Core Sound Decoy Carvers Guild is a group of decoy waterfowl carvers from Harkers Island. The guild began in 1987 and hosts the Core Sound Decoy Festival annually. The mission of the group is to educate new generations about decoy carving through workshops, shows, and demonstrations in order to preserve these skills for the future.
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Record #:
34482
Abstract:
This article is a reprint of an essay written by Charles Bell, 1907. The essay describes a local farm owned by Emeline Pigott, a Confederate supporter during the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on notable terrain features, agriculture, and daily life.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p7-8, il