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15 results for Prohibition
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Record #:
10604
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Abstract:
Recent rejection of liquor by the drink in towns across North Carolina is a reminder of our state's 150 year history supporting prohibition. The state's first temperance society was founded in Guilford County in 1822. Four years later, Orange County Presbyterians formed the Society for the Suppression of Intemperance. The Sons of Temperance, a national fraternal order, launched a Raleigh chapter in 1842, but met with limited success until an 1851 membership drive featuring temperance lecturer Philip S. White. By year's end, North Carolina boasted 12,000 members in 281 chapters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 2, June 1970, p12-13, il
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Record #:
11404
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Walter Murphy, a native of Salisbury, has served in 17 sessions of the North Carolina General Assembly. He is in charge of the 18th Amendment repeal drive in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 6, July 1933, p1
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Record #:
11405
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Hinsdale, a well-known attorney and legislator of Raleigh, presents his arguments in favor of repealing prohibition.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 7, July 1933, p6, 8
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Record #:
11412
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When the 18th Amendment is repealed, then what? Is a question many North Carolinians ask. Harris Newman of Wilmington, a distinguished lawyer and member of the North Carolina General Assembly, attempts to answer the question.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 15, Sept 1933, p1, 20, por
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Record #:
11413
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Dr. Wm. Louis Poteat, one of the state's most illustrious citizens and educators and a supporter of Prohibition, responds to Harriss Newman's article which appeared in The State, Volume 1, Issue 15.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 17, Sept 1933, p1, 21, por
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Record #:
11441
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In this article, written by a prominent, but unnamed member of the United Dry Forces, the writer explains how the supporters of Prohibition organized to defeat the repeal of the 18th Amendment in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 25, Nov 1933, p7, por
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Record #:
11435
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Dr. Poteat, pastor of the Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh and one of North Carolina's strong supporters of Prohibition, states his views relative to the issue of repeal.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 21, Oct 1933, p1, 21, por
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Record #:
11434
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Murphy, executive secretary of the United Council for Repeal, discusses why North Carolina needs to repeal Prohibition in the upcoming election.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 20, Oct 1933, p3, 17, por
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Record #:
14997
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He not only had a successful administration as Governor, but Robert Brodnax Glenn was a great orator, an outstanding lawyer, and a magnetic leader who wielded a powerful influence over the promotion of prohibition.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 38, Feb 1943, p5, 22, 26
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Record #:
15340
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Prohibition extended unfairly to members of the Cherokee nation in the 1930s. Cultural biases and stereotypes about Native American inability to handle alcohol perpetuated strict prohibition enforcement on western North Carolina's Native American reservations. Under section 2139 of the Revised Statutes of the United States established in 1832, supplying Native Americans with liquor came with a two year prison sentence and $300 fine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937, p9, il
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Record #:
15421
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Once the despair of many a Federal prohibition agent, East Lake, a little swamp-hidden village of perhaps 250 souls on the Dare County mainland, has had hard sledding since the Volstead Act and the Eighteenth Amendment went by the boards. East Lake, the unofficial capital of booze making back in the Dry Era lay its chief claim to glory on a potent variety of ardent spirits known far and wide as \"East Lake Dew\" and marketed in quart bottles bearing imported labels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 20, Oct 1936, p3, 18, f
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Record #:
17745
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Distilling alcohol for private consumption has been regulated in the state since 1715. Complete prohibition occurred in 1908 after the passing of Watts and Ward Law. One reason distillation remained so prevalent in the northeast portion of the state is that distilling used the similar equipment as for making turpentine, an already established industry in the area. Dare County moonshiners took to distilling both because they already had the equipment and also tough economic times drove them to lucrative manufacturing and sale of alcohol.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p7-23, il
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Record #:
11406
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Rev. Charles H. Dickey, a Baptist minister from Williamston, presents his arguments against the repeal of prohibition.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 7, July 1933, p7-8
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Record #:
34702
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During prohibition in the 1920s, the American schooner VINCENT ran aground on Cape Lookout. Residents from Cape Lookout caught sight of the vessel and went out to see the wreck firsthand. They discovered vinegar bottles filled with scotch whiskey on shore and began collecting the cargo. The fisherman proceeded to recover and sell the whiskey casks.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p15-17, il
Record #:
35970
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One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23