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8 results for Education, Rural
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Record #:
5902
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Abstract:
Through funds provided by philanthropist Julius Rosenwald to improve African American education, 5,300 Rosenwald schools were built in rural areas of 15 Southern states between 1917 and 1932. North Carolina built the most with over 830. Many have fallen into ruin. An effort is now underway \"to find, identify, and record the location of these schools before the structures disappear altogether.\"
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Record #:
6859
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Abstract:
In 1926, a school was raised in a black community near the town of Wake Forest in Wake County. The school was one of 813 Rosenwald Schools built in North Carolina and was named for its first principal, W. M. McElrath. Goebel describes the construction of the school and the classroom activities after it opened. The school integrated in 1970, and it closed in 1989, when a new school was built nearby. In 1998, an association spearheaded by former students purchased the building, with the intent of restoring it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p120-122, 125-126, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7209
Abstract:
The North Carolina Association of Educators recognized the efforts of the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office and North Carolina's Rosenwald Schools Community Project to preserve the heritage of the schools. These schools for African American children were funded by matching grants provided by Chicago philanthropist Julius Rosenwald to African American communities that raised a certain amount of money. Between the late 1910s and 1932, there were 813 of the Rosenwald schools built in North Carolina, more than in any other state. Over 120 of the schools are still standing today.
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Record #:
14787
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Wilson County schools underwent changes after Superintendent K. R. Curtis took over in 1943. He introduced programs to aid families during war time constraints, this included education for children and parents alike. Farmers could go to classes a few days a week to learn vocational skills to better maintain and repair farm equipment during a time when such machinery was scarce. Teachers, in cooperation with parents, assigned advanced school work to students that may need to stay home and assist with farming during the school year. Curtis further emphasized agriculture by demanding agricultural vocation programs in 100% of Wilson County schools.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1943, p4-5, 24
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Record #:
15263
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Abstract:
Families in remote areas of the western mountains emerged in the 1930s as developments encroached on the mountainous area. Smaller schools for the remote communities in the area were consolidated into the Highlands' school system which was not favored by citizens of the area and they withdrew their children. Frances Morgan was an early pioneer to open an elementary school in 1933 in the small town of Broadway and reverse the trend of closing smaller schools that served smaller communities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 38, Feb 1939, p1, 26, il
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Record #:
29713
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Arthur Morgan School is a nonprofit boarding and day school in the Celo community near Burnsville, North Carolina. This school uses a different approach to learning, one that is based on Montessori and Quaker values such as simple living and consensual decision making. The result is a progressive farm school where students live, work, create and learn together.
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Record #:
34488
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Williamson details a letter from Mr. Daniel Bryan Dickinson to the County Superintendent for school services rendered from 1883. The original letter is included with Williamson’s notes.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p8
Record #:
36971
Abstract:
Morton Academy, a schoolhouse slated for demolition, can educate generations to come about the school experience of yesteryear, thanks to the efforts of two locals. Hints of what this experience was like was offered in this article through information about the typical 19th century schoolhouse and Onslow County schoolhouses in the early 20th century.