NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Beaufort Inlet
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3917
Author(s):
Abstract:
By studying the historical geography of Beaufort Inlet, Intersal, Inc. was able to determine inlet boundaries, features, and obstacles in the 18th-century. Using this data, the firm conducted a ten-year search that discovered what is thought to be the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p24-33, il
Record #:
30752
Author(s):
Abstract:
The shipwreck in Beaufort inlet believed to be one of Blackbeard’s ships, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, continues to be surveyed and excavated. Current magnetometer surveys of a thirty by fifty foot section of the site reveals what could be an additional cannon in an area where four have already been recovered. This would be the nineteenth cannon found from this site so far.
Source:
Record #:
35896
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Crystal Coast included treasures not to be found in a chest or pirate ship. Included among the troves of visit worthy towns including the stretch between Beaufort and Cedar Island known as “the Original Downeast.” Proving its value of an historic sort entailed mention of Beaufort’s colonial roots and remembrance of Fort Macon as a Civil War battle site. As for personal historic merit, cited was Pine Knoll Shore’s connection to relatives of Theodore Roosevelt.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p27-33
Record #:
35970
Author(s):
Abstract:
One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23