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8 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 245, Aug 1987
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Record #:
33492
Author(s):
Abstract:
Urban planning experts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill report that population and economic growth have left many cities and towns in the Southeast with inadequate water supply and sewer systems. They attribute this condition more to a lack of planning and realistic pricing than a lack of ability to pay for the necessary facilities. Municipalities are trying to cope with growth pressures through conservation and postponed expansion, and by shifting financial burden to the private sector.
Record #:
33497
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists in the University of North Carolina Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering say that groundwater supplies located in granite and gneiss rock types in the Blue Ridge, Inner Piedmont, and Raleigh Belt geologic regions are more likely to have high concentrations of radon-222 than other groundwater supplies in North Carolina. The study was supported by the Water Resources Research Institute and provides recommendations for managing radon concentrations in drinking water.
Record #:
33495
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission is considering recommendations to declare the entire Neuse River basin as a nutrient-sensitive watershed. The recommendation is aimed at combatting the causes of algae infestations in the lower Neuse River and reducing nutrient loading of the Pamlico Sound. The nutrient-sensitive designation would enable limits to be imposed on the amount of phosphorus in wastewater discharges into the watershed.
Record #:
33493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation was introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly to establish a commission to study the issue of watershed protection standards. The bill was prompted by concerns among Raleigh city officials about pollution threats to Falls Lake, the main source of drinking water for Raleigh and much of Wake County. The proposed commission would investigate the need for watershed development standards beyond a local basis.
Record #:
33494
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission proposed regulations for allocating water supply from Jordan Lake. The rules set out a process to guide water supply allocation but do not allocate the water to specific users. The proposed rule would also require that fifty-percent of the water supply remain unallocated in first-round allocations.
Record #:
33498
Author(s):
Abstract:
Food science specialists at North Carolina State University say that present economic incentives for water conservation and waste minimization in the food industries are very strong, and assistance provided by North Carolina’s Pollution Prevention Pays Program is enhancing those incentives. Public perception has also been an important incentive for waste reduction in the food industries.
Record #:
33496
Author(s):
Abstract:
A report published by the Water Resources Research Institute concludes that nitrogen loading should be reduced by at least thirty-percent and that phosphorus loading should be reduced by at least fifty-percent to stem algal blooms and support a long-term management strategy for the lower Neuse River.
Record #:
33499
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1987 State of the Environment Report, two major concerns were the quality and quantity of North Carolina’s water resources, and hazardous and radioactive waste management. According to the report, the state must give priority attention to water and waste management because of the declining role of the federal government in these areas.