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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 6 Issue 1, July 1958
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Record #:
35152
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Abstract:
A collection of stories dealing with gold and ore mining in North Carolina. The stories included are: “Gold is Discovereed: the Reed Mine,” “A Deep Grave,” “Bechtler Coins,” “Gold Hill,” “The Newmon Brothers,” “Catastrope down in the Randolph Shaft,” and “Ore Knob,” which includes a ballad.
Record #:
35151
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Abstract:
This article touches on some of the most popular aspects of the Outer Banks. It deals with the origins of its original inhabitants, including people and ponies, some place names and topographic terms, wrecking practices of Nags Head, and more.
Record #:
35154
Abstract:
The two songs mentioned in the title are preceded by a short story about a woman that the author had met who sang wonderful folksongs. The two songs recorded were sung by that woman and are titled “My Horses ain’t Hungry,” and “Black Jack Davy.” Each song is accompanied with both the sheet music and lyrics.
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Record #:
35155
Author(s):
Abstract:
A brief story of the serenading of a young woman gone wrong. Through miscommunication, the serenades were run off by the father, who thought his household was under attack.
Record #:
35156
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two stories centering on Edward Teach, or Blackbeard’s, time in North Carolina. One is about his time in Bath, and the other is the legend of him burying a chest of money.
Record #:
35153
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Abstract:
This article contains the folktales “The Mouse got Drowned in the Cabbage Pot,” and “The Little Round House,” which includes illustrations.
Record #:
35157
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of a ghost ship that appears every year at the same time, on fire and following a path back and forth to the same spot. Supposedly, the crew members of the ship had lit it on fire after murdering and robbing the passengers, who were German Protestants, but the ship never burned down.