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177 results for "Sea Chest"
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Record #:
29978
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was in danger from encroaching erosion, Mr. Bill Garret and his 'Seascape' stepped in to help. An artificial seaweed made from plastic, Seascape was built up into a reef along the shore of the lighthouse to dissipate erosion. The units of Seascape have so far been successful and an order has been made to add more offshore.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p32-37, il, por
Record #:
29980
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wetlands in North Carolina are being ruined by factories, refineries, and encroaching wood production. But given the value of wetlands to provide natural pollution control, as well as outdoor recreation activities, the Carolina Wetland Project of the National Wildlife Federation is bringing attention to the cause and working to save them.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p52-53, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29977
Abstract:
Anchored off Cape Hatteras, the Lightship No. 17 was torpedoed by a German U-boat in 1918. After a succession of torpedoes the lightship was left to settle and sink, while the U-boat gave chase to tankers. The present Diamond Shoals Lightship was placed in 1920.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p30-31, il
Record #:
29979
Abstract:
Built in 1896, the Avon Fish House was located on stilts in the sound. Fish received at the Avon Fish House was sold to Globe Fish Company in New York, and the fish house was handed down from generation to next, located later in the Avon Harbor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p48-49, por
Record #:
36020
Abstract:
Described were three ways how the “oldest horse in North America” arrived on Outer Banks, all taking place during Elizabeth I’s reign. The population on Shackleford Banks and Currituck, low because of laws passed since the 1930s, could be considered valuable because of their demand. As for their value to the residents, called Bankers, that couldn’t be measured monetarily.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p8-10
Record #:
36021
Abstract:
Its recently celebrated centennial history included the destruction of its first structure by the Hurricane of 1933. As donations and many member fundraising efforts proved, a house of God wasn’t made just from newer wood and nails, not even the original lamps and piano.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p18-19
Record #:
36022
Abstract:
A library’s archives typically contain donations of letters and documents. For Hatteras Island’s Library, a 125 year old quilt reflected what the town’s culture perceived as preservation worthy. Current creators of these quilts, in discussing the tradition of quilt-making, also proved that the “Human Library” concept is not so new.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p20-21
Record #:
36024
Abstract:
Maude White, whose career history included postal employee and boarding house owner, kept memories of Buxton School alive. Included in her recollections was Charlie Gray, well known for his accomplishments in the classroom and out. Also mentioned by this teacher of thirty-four years was an instructor not well known for classroom management.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p38-41
Record #:
36023
Abstract:
Among the feathered residents in the Island’s refuge were Canada Geese. In addition to the practice of branding, ways to keep an avian population intact included suitable breeding ground and sustainable food supply.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p23-25
Record #:
29935
Abstract:
In the early days, sailing vessels were used to transport goods from the mainland to the villages on the Outer Banks. Using two-masted vessels, crew would sail to Elizabeth City for food, supplies, building materials, and coal.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p22-23, por
Record #:
29934
Abstract:
George O'Neal, Jr. is working to save a collection of 21 ship models made by his father, George O'Neal, Sr. The collection, which includes models of historic and modern sailing vessels from barkentines to schooners, provide examines of vessels that sailed the North Carolina coast.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p18-21, por
Record #:
29933
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once used for fishing and as a main mode of transportation on the Outer Banks, the spritsail skiff could hold up to two to three hundred pounds of fish in one run. Although once prominent, the spritsail skiffs have gone out of style with the introduction of powered boats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p8-11, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29932
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last spritsail skiff on the Outer Banks was built in 1931 by Bill Quidley and sold to Vetter Willams for $35.00. The boat was used for fishing and transportation before it was sold to Loran O'Neal who modified the boat as a pleasure craft.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p6-7, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29955
Abstract:
The National Park Service is trying to buy time for the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse until a decision is made about what to do concerning erosion. A temporary measure has been to install sheet pile to resist water, but an alternative involves moving the lighthouse approximately 2400 feet back from the shoreline.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, pSP1-SP4, por
Record #:
29956
Author(s):
Abstract:
For easy-to-handle and stable boats for oystering, North Carolinians 1880s chose the sharpie. From the 1880s to the 1930s, sharpies provided oystermen with high decks and rounded sterns to maneuver in the reefs and sounds.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p31, por
Subject(s):