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6 results for Fire departments--North Carolina
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Record #:
16705
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leggett muses about North Carolina's small communities and the importance of volunteer fire departments to these communities.
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Record #:
17480
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mr. Brockwell was the State Fire Marshal and he comments on the financial state of city fire departments. He argues for the need to have more paid firemen rather than depending on volunteers; the ratio in 1936 was 3,212 volunteers compared to 750 professional firemen.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 5, Feb 1937, p9-10, 15, por
Record #:
19576
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1898, Washington, N.C. became one of the most technologically advanced fire departments in the state with its acquisition of a Silsby steam fire engine. This technological marvel was able to pumped between 500 and 600 gallons of water per minute and was used in its last fire in 1937. Today the Silsby sits on display in the front room of the current fire station, visible to those who travel by.
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Record #:
22796
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Abstract:
Started in 1948 by fire-chief George Gardner, he started a public campaign to raise donations from individuals and area businesses for $4,500 worth of equipment. With this money he purchased a 1948 panel truck, iron lung, a hospital type oxygen tent and small tools. The rescue Squad was operated by the Fire Department and by donations only. As the calls grew, in 1955 the Junior Jaycees and Fire Department sponsored the formation of a Volunteer Rescue Squad composed of four firemen and 10 volunteers. In 1959, a Rescue Squad annex was dedicated beside the central Fire Station and was showered with gifts of equipment by area businesses. The Greenville Rescue Squad was recognized as the best in the State and was one of the best on the eastern seaboard.
Record #:
29981
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before 1960, fires on the Hatteras Island were attended to by concerned villagers who would save what they could. But the people realized that there needed to be something else they could do. With the help of some regional fire chiefs and money raised by the community, a fire house and engine were finally on the Island. Now the fire department consists of 50-60 well-trained fire fighters and five pieces of fire fighting apparatus from the villages of Buxton, Frisco, and Hatteras.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p54-58, por
Record #:
34244
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a research project submitted to the National Fire Academy as part of the Executive Fire Officer Program, Raleigh Assistant Fire Chief Earl F. Fowler recommends that municipal fire officials prepare themselves and their cities to make decisions that can avert environmental disaster in the case of large scale fire suppression operations. Fowler says the City of Raleigh and fire departments across the state need to develop policy and procedures to protect local water ways from pollution by fire-fighting runoff water.