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Record #:
35286
Abstract:
An area of rock outcropping in Warren County was said to be frequented by the devil; it had a footprint in the center, raised track marks, and is mysteriously cleared of smaller rocks each day.
Record #:
35494
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina is the largest folklore collection in the United States; included within the article is several of its unpublished works, including games, sayings, and legends.
Record #:
35597
Abstract:
Supposedly a Native American legend, this story was published by Zebulon Baird Vance in 1852. It tells the story of a Native American warrior who journeyed east to acquire a gun, in order to kill a great serpent, which had been terrorizing the tribe.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35593
Author(s):
Abstract:
The two stories are about money that is supposedly buried in the remains of a community, and the ghost of Lady Vanderbilt, who haunted a cabin in the woods.
Record #:
35660
Abstract:
In 1901, Nell Cropsey was murdered. Although her boyfriend was charged with her murder due to circumstantial evidence, the true events were never known. This has caused Nell’s story to become a legend, and different speculations and variations arose from the mystery. Along with the stories came several folksongs about the incident.
Record #:
35670
Author(s):
Abstract:
A collection of stories from teenage boys about ghosts, haunted houses, murder, and more.
Record #:
35695
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Bigfoot Legend was widespread: sightings in Columbus and Brunswick Counties proved this. The discovery in Winnabow of footprint tracks, nearly a foot and a half long, was no exception to the standard story. Where they from man or beast of exceptional size, though? One native offered a $25.00 cash award for anyone willing to provide proof.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35704
Author(s):
Abstract:
North of Elizabeth City lies a stretch of land that does not allow anything to grow. Said to be haunted, a couple of teenagers in the late 1960s drove out there and were chased in their car by a monster that came out of the nearby river.
Record #:
35716
Author(s):
Abstract:
While exploring around the Cape Fear River, a young man spied a beautiful mermaid, just like the ones that were rumored to be in Scotland. Taking this as a good omen, the man decided to stay in the Cape Fear region and build his life.
Record #:
35795
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the mid-1800s, a house in Lenoir County was erected by Jesse Jackson, and housed the Jackson family line until 1976, when Simon Jackson, the last of his name, died. Simon Jackson was an eccentric man with a multitude of stories attached to his name, some of which are recounted here.
Record #:
36890
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
35826
Author(s):
Abstract:
Learning part of a song when he was a boy, the author strove to find the full song when he finished high school. As the tale goes, Johnny Sands and Patty Haig married after happening upon a pot of buried treasure. Wanting the gold for herself, Patty Haig attempted to kill Johnny, but ended up dying herself.
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
35825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Known as a folk legend in the Southern Appalachia region, two tales regarding Daniel Boone are recorded here.
Record #:
35879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Countering the appeal of Jaws, the latest film beast offering chills, thrills, and spills, was Stanley’s story of the great white hog. It proved that these triple attraction factors were not necessary to generate a tantalizing tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p51, 63