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27 results for Insects
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Record #:
30042
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A survey of ants and cockroaches present near suburban houses was conducted in Wake County, North Carolina. Observations from trapped insects show twenty-six species of ants, and indicate that the smoky brown cockroach (Periplaneta fuliginosa) is a prevalent pest that occurs both indoors and outdoors.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p9-16, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30060
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Spider mites and false spider mites can cause considerable damage to plants. This report summarizes records for species of spider mites and false spider mites in North Carolina, as well as their plant hosts. Information is also provided on additional species that might be found in the state when more extensive collecting is done.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 12, Sept 1986, p19-27, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30075
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This paper offers a taxonomic and ecological summary of all known species of Sympotthastia, a genus of non-biting midges in the insect family Chironomidae. Chironomid larvae occur in all types of aquatic or brackish waters. Species found in the Nearctic realm of North Carolina provide additional information on the larval stages of certain species.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p39-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30079
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The adult male and female, and immature stages, of Paracricotopus millrockensis are described from specimens collected in North Carolina and Georgia. This is a new species of Orthocladiinae, an insect subfamily of non-biting midges. The species has been found in small streams associated with stone substrates, and the larvae feed mainly on detritus and algae.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p161-168, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30078
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The trechines are a group of small carabid beetles that includes many species restricted to cool, moist microhabitats. In the Appalachian region, they are abundant in caves of the Unaka mountain province of western North Carolina and adjacent Tennessee. New species are described and illustrated from Camp Creek Bald, North Carolina/Tennessee.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p119-132, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30126
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Bembidion plagiatum, one of the scarcest species of beetle in its genus, is reported from new localities in North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. This study provides information on the species’ behavior, distribution, and habitat preference.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 7, July 1982, p145-150, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
34612
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Many native tropical insect species have counterparts in temperate climates of North America. The Eastern Hercules beetle, the Devil’s mare walking stick, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly are all common insects found in North Carolina that are closely related to tropical and desert insects.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2014, p6-7, il
Record #:
35428
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Abstract:
Profiled was the North Carolina Museum of Art’s 20th Annual Bugfest, touted by the author as the single largest bug-centric event held in the United States. This article discussed the theme of that year’s event, ants. Also noted was two Museum ant experts and their NCSU colleague’s list of seven favorite ants, which included the Exploding Ant and Indian Jumping Ant.
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Record #:
36156
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This collection of the top ten photos included categories such as ages of the photographers, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and animal behavior. Nearly all of the winners came from towns in North Carolina’s three regions.
Record #:
36199
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This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
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Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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Record #:
36212
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Abstract:
An aspect of exploration that may not be included in history texts is the introduction of living things from other places into the land being explored, such as insects and plants. While they may be harmless, the author places emphasis on those considered invasive, or hitchhikers. The author noted that invasive plants and animals can inflict economic and environmental damage. Examples of invasive insects included Colorado potato beetle and Silverleaf whitefly. As for invasive plants, examples were Emerald ash borer and Crapemyrtle bark scale.
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