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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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64 results for "Water supply"
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Record #:
29077
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Abstract:
Water levels are declining in North Carolina’s rivers and streams due to increased development and water withdrawals, as well as climate change. The biggest concerns are over the availability of drinking water and pollution. Environmentalists say the state should toughen the requirements on permits for withdrawals to reflect the lower water flow.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27782
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Abstract:
The North Carolina American Water Works Association (NCAWWA) announced the winners of its annual tap water taste test on Nov. 13. The trade organization awarded Charlotte-Mecklenburg first place, followed by Cary, and Durham. The sources of each town’s water is detailed and what makes each unique and tasty.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
25343
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The Riverkeeper gives advice on how to maintain a long-term, sustainable water supply. In addition they cover a plan for how to implement the sustainability.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Winter 2010, p5
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Record #:
25825
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Abstract:
North Carolina has long been considered rich in water resources. In the last decade, however, the state has suffered two droughts that have forced cities to implement increasing water restrictions. UNC experts are exploring solutions to water scarcity, such as policy reform, water engineering, and city planning.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 3, Spring 2008, p42-46, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28106
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the state’s drought gets worse, the amount of water available is an area of serious concern. The state can only step in to help with a water shortage if there is no water available at local stores and the market cannot support the state’s population. Private water bottling companies pull water from local municipalities and then sell it back to residents at a higher cost. The impact these companies have on the state’s supply and the state's drought plans are detailed in-depth.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p14-18 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28237
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Abstract:
Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area is in the middle of a drought and many individuals and local officials are ignoring the problem. Many residents are ignorant of their responsibility to their community. The problem also is showing how the overall demand for water is finally catching up with the supply which has been brought on by increased growth and a lack of planning. Officials need to develop long-term plans to deal with the problem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 41, October 2007, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28357
Author(s):
Abstract:
The citizens of the Triangle area are flunking the water conservation test as the drought goes on. Most of the state and city leaders are failing citizens too. Soon, all residents will have no choice but deal with involuntary water cutbacks if the trends continue. This is the time for leaders and citizens step up and to work together to preserve what water is left.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 51, December 2007, p14-15 Periodical Website
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Record #:
34365
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Abstract:
North Carolina is facing the possibility of having to conserve its public water supplies to protect against an uncertain rainfall-streamflow pattern over the next several months. As the state continues to experience rapid growth, demand for public water supplies tends to follow closely. This article discusses water supplies in Wake and Mecklenburg counties and the use of quarries for expanding reservoir capacity.
Record #:
34367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists say that the most important and predictable water-related impacts of climate change on North Carolina is rising sea level. This has impacts on rainfall and streamflow, on which much of North Carolina’s water supplies are dependent. This article discusses the consensus of scientists and predictions in North Carolina.
Record #:
34369
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 20, at the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council meeting, Governor Mike Easley stated he will bring thirty of the state’s worst hit water systems together on January 14, in Greensboro to review the status of these systems. The council will review plans for the drought and reserve sources of water.
Record #:
34368
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is experiencing a severe drought, and cities are questioning how bad its effects will be on public water supplies. This article discusses records of previous droughts in North Carolina and how conservation of water resources was addressed.
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Record #:
34361
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given the experiences in North Carolina over the past decade with devastating hurricanes, there is concern over the protection of water supplies and how the state should respond to natural disasters, accidents, or contamination. This article discusses policies and emergency management in North Carolina.
Record #:
34362
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has an average annual rainfall of forty inches, but in recent years, widespread drought has raised concern over the abundance of water supplies. This article examines the current state of water supply and water use in North Carolina.
Record #:
34358
Abstract:
Following recent drought conditions, many North Carolina communities are developing water conservation plans and identifying backup water sources. Increasing development in some mountain watersheds is resulting in hydrologic changes, including increasing storm water runoff, erosion and sediment transport, unstable streambanks, and loss of flood plains. These changes will result in more frequent floods with greater impacts to low-lying communities.