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14 results for Emergency management
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Record #:
3090
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Hurricane Fran's 1996 blow across the state brought not only destruction to a number of towns and cities, but also a swift response to the emergency by local governments.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 1996, p1,8-9, il
Record #:
3623
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An emergency management mutual aid agreement has been signed by about 200 counties and municipalities. Signees of the pact, developed by the N.C. League of Municipalities and local governments, can request help from other signees in time of disaster.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p3-4, il
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Record #:
4167
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Twelve feet beneath the state government Administration Building in Raleigh is the N.C. Emergency Management office. This office responds statewide to two types of emergencies: man-made disasters, including chemical spills; and natural disasters, including snowstorms and hurricanes. The office locates and coordinates help from state and local agencies and focuses it on the emergency at hand.
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Record #:
4435
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Project Impact: Building Disaster Resistant Communities, started by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in 1997, is a plan to make communities more resistant to natural disasters. Over 120 towns participate nationwide, with New Hanover County/Wilmington, Charlotte/Mecklenburg County, and Boone participating in North Carolina. Buncombe and Lenoir Counties and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians will join the program in 2000.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 12, Dec 1999, p8, il
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Record #:
4668
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Hurricane Floyd and the subsequent flooding in September 1999 caused the state's worst natural disaster. Schwab summarizes the storm's disastrous effects on Eastern Carolina and describes the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management's initiative of hazard mitigation that seeks to promote local level planning to insure preparedness the next time a natural disaster strikes.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Spring 2000, p2-12, il
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Record #:
5492
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Hurricane Floyd, and the subsequent flooding, took 52 lives, destroyed 8,000 homes, and damaged 67,000 more. The havoc was unprecedented in the state's history. How can the state be prepared for the next disaster? Among the recommendations made by the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research are remapping the floodplains and keeping them up-to-date and, following Florida's example, creating an Emergency Management Trust Fund.
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Record #:
8044
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Hurricanes striking North Carolina have not devastated large population centers as Hurricane Katrina did in New Orleans. Still, the state has had its share of disasters from Fran, Floyd, Bonnie, Dennis, and Isabel. Katrina exposed serious deficiencies in hurricane response at the Federal level. This in turn places more responsibility on county and state emergency managers. Secret discusses what needs to be done and what state and local officials are doing to stay ahead of the coming storms.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 25, June 2006, p16-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8283
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Randy Mundt maps floodplains for the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management. He is well versed in hazard mitigation, or stopping disasters before they start. In this CAROLINA PLANNING interview, Mundt discusses the roles of the state and local governments in hazard mitigation, the effects of Hurricane Katrina on North Carolina hazard mitigation, and the role of insurance companies.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Winter 2006, p42-45
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Record #:
25525
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Following Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the U.S. Geological Society (USGS) advanced efforts to improve storm-surge data gathering and understanding. Data collection has made a tremendous leap from measuring post-storm watermarks on buildings to implementing more accurate gauge-based measurements.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p32-36, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
28564
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In wake of Hurricane Matthew’s devastation in North Carolina, state and local officials are looking for creative suggestions from university faculty and students. One option for long-term recovery is Community Scale Assisted Migration, a program that helps move residents out of the floodplain by keeps them near their community.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28565
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The Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST), a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, helps with recovery of cultural heritage collections. Following Hurricane Matthew, CREST held workshops on properly cleaning and preserving personal documents, and developed a database of institutions affected by the hurricane.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
33487
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The North Carolina Division of Emergency Management and the National Weather Service are developing the Integrated Flood Observing and Warning System (IFLOWS), which will give residents of seventeen mountain counties one-half to three hours warning of flash-flood conditions. The system is designed to predict flash flooding in areas characterized by steep slopes and narrow valleys where flash flooding is likely to occur.
Record #:
34363
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A new Emergency Operations Center for North Carolina and a state emergency response fund to be tapped during hurricanes and other natural disasters are urgent necessities identified by the Joint Study Committee on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management Recovery. Eleven legislative proposals are being introduced during the General Assembly short session to fulfill these needs.
Record #:
34361
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Given the experiences in North Carolina over the past decade with devastating hurricanes, there is concern over the protection of water supplies and how the state should respond to natural disasters, accidents, or contamination. This article discusses policies and emergency management in North Carolina.