NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Tar Heel Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte musician Arthur Smith is the subject of this TAR HEEL interview. Smith has been in show business for over forty years. He has composed over 1,500 songs, recorded 300 singles and sixty albums, and worked on five motion pictures. His syndicated country-western music television show is seen daily all over the Southeast.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p30-32, 63-64, por
Record #:
6255
Author(s):
Abstract:
Unexplained and unsolved mysteries have occurred in North Carolina over the centuries. One of them is the Brown Mountain Lights seen in Burke County as wavering, mysterious lights, rising above the mountain ridge, hovering, then fading away. To this day, no one has found an explanation for them.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p19-20, il, map
Record #:
6254
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Rhine Research Center Institute for Parapsychology was founded by Dr. J. B. Rhine and others in Durham in 1927 and later moved to Duke University in 1935. Griffin discusses the work of Rhine and his wife, Dr. Louisa Rhine, in this particular field.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p34-35, por
Record #:
35686
Abstract:
Hain’ts, not horror films, was thrilling entertainment in Coastal counties such as Sampson and during the author’s youth. As she proved in her illuminations of things that go bump in the dark, though, ghosts chasing and the stories they inspire are really timeless and universal pastimes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p24-25
Record #:
35685
Abstract:
The authors assured that no degree or work experience in education was necessary for creating this effective teaching tool, whether parents sought to educate, entertain, or encourage their children. Especially promoted, though, was the potential for instilling reading skills and enhancing parent-child bonding.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p11-15
Record #:
35684
Author(s):
Abstract:
The past made tactile was defined individually and collectively. The evidence had been excavated in Piedmont counties such as Alexander and Lakes such as High Rock. Tangible proof was represented in artifacts such as arrowheads, pipes, scrapers, and beads.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p9, 54
Record #:
35688
Author(s):
Abstract:
The golden weed was tobacco, part of a scam that went down in history. It was memorable partly because of the unexpected co-conspirators for the shady sale of the tainted tobacco: two men passing themselves off as reverends.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p38-43
Subject(s):
Record #:
35687
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author disclosed that short term costs for installing solar power, whether by flat-plate or heating system, was high. In light of long term benefits, plus its plentitude, Lofton proposed it was an investment worthy alternate fuel source.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p27-29
Record #:
35691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Its original name was the “Meeting House”: its latter name, Cape Fear Baptist Church, inspired by the nearby stream. A Colonial construction, this church in Gray’s Creek was touted as one of the first erected in Cumberland County. Its value was also asserted by an illustrious history: a temporary hospital and bivouac site for General Sherman’s troops.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p49
Record #:
35690
Abstract:
Wood was espoused as a viable alternative heat source and solution for the energy crisis. As proof that wood was a cut above the rest economically, the author included examples of the best types, such as ash, beech, and dogwood, and the only necessary equipment, a chain saw and axe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p
Record #:
35689
Abstract:
Drying, preparing, or blanching were economic and easy alternatives to canning, the authors proposed. Proof in this pudding could be found in their directions for these methods, along with an image of a drying box and timetable for blanching a variety of fruits and vegetables.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p45
Subject(s):