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10 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014
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Record #:
24611
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During World War II, David Finley, the first director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. needed a sanctuary for the fine art in the gallery. Finley turned to his friend Edith Vanderbilt, who willingly agreed to hide these rare pieces of art at the Biltmore Estate. Painstaking effort ensured that the pieces were hidden and stored in a room with steel vaulted doors and steel barred windows. Some pieces kept at the Biltmore included Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, Raphael’s Portrait of Bindo Altoviti, and Titian’s Venus with a Mirror.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p40-42, 44, 46-47, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24613
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U.S. Highway 276 is considered one of the most beautiful drives in North Carolina. The two-lane road crosses the South-North Carolina board 13 miles south of Brevard and winds for 63 miles through Dupont State Forest and Pisgah National Forest until it meets Interstate 40 near Waynesville. The scenic drive brings travelers close to Cold Mountain, Looking Glass Falls, and Connestee Falls, as well as other natural landmarks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p112-114, 116-118, 120, 122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24614
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The Blue Ridge Parkway, built by the Works Progress Administration, was intended to be a pleasant driving experience and a way to travel from Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In North Carolina, there are 25 tunnels on the Blue Ridge Parkway, ranging in length from 150 feet to 1,434 feet long.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p140-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24612
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Beginning in Charlotte, N.C. 115 runs 72 miles north to the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Wilkesboro. The road winds through North Carolina countryside and passes through a number of growing towns and landmarks, including Lake Norman, Davidson, Mooresville, and Statesville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p100-104, 106, 108, 110, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24610
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Lexington calls itself the “Barbecue Capital of North Carolina,” due to the number of barbecue restaurants in town, the annual barbecue festival, and the Bar B-Q Center restaurant. The Bar-B-Q Center, which opened in 1955, is one of the best-known barbecue joints in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p49-50, 52-53, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24609
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The shad is North Carolina’s state historical boat and its history dates back to the Reconstruction era. George Washington Creef built the first shad in 1881 and it became a popular boat for those who fished for a living.
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24615
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NASCAR has its roots in North Carolina, for it began with mountain moonshiners who rigged to cars fast enough to run from the law and turned into a race culture following the end of Prohibition. With the Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, and a number of older speedways throughout the western part of the state, North Carolina continues to cultivate the rich NASCAR culture.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p176-186, 188, 190, 192, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24617
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As part ten of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the interstate slave trade in North Carolina, the movement of male slaves to the western part of the state, and what the imminent end of the Confederacy meant for slaveholders, as well as slaves.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p213-214, 216, 218-220, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24616
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Two French brothers, Joseph and Etienne Montgolfier, invented the hot air balloon in 1783. North Carolina hot air balloon pilots keep their invention alive with the Carolina BalloonFest held in Statesville each year. Each October, residents can join the pilots at the Statesville Regional Airport and fly thousands of feet above the ground.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p192-196, 198, 200, 202-203, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
38059
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With the same ability as places like Thomas Episcopal Church, Bath, to connect past and present is Wildacres. Started as a writers and artists’ summer resort by author Thomas Dixon, it started to come full circle, purpose wise, through its purchase during the Depression by Charlotte’s Blumenthal family. Initially a religious retreat site, Wildacres serves as a haven for musicians, who offer free concerts open to the local community.