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10 results for North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine Vol. 10 Issue 4, August/September 2018
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Record #:
38115
Abstract:
A renowned Eastern North Carolina artist extended his passion for coastal living and people beyond the canvas. Frank Stick can be credited for starting Southern Shores and an architectural style that is part of the town’s identity. Stick's Flat Top cottages, with features such as concrete block walls and solid shutters, could withstand certain weather conditions and extended unoccupancy. His efforts to maintain the lives within those walls extended to overseeing financing and assisting with keeping cottages during owners’ challenging financial times. Today, the community extends its appreciation through preservation efforts such as historic landmark designation and the Outer Banks Community Foundation.
Record #:
38116
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Abstract:
Hunting in Eastern North Carolina has shifted its purpose from utilitarian to sport, but one aspect that has not changed is coastal community members, reflected in established surnames such as Cahoon, Garrish, and Swindell participate. Individual participation is reflected in Chase Luker, a Hyde County resident who keeps coastal community tradition alive through hunting related activities such as decoy carving. Descriptions include the label he applies to himself (Southern Outer Banks), his decoy creation approach (great attention to feathery details), and his role models (Wayland Baum, John Williams, and Frank Gaskill).
Record #:
38117
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Abstract:
Due to dwindling attendance, St. Mark’s in Roxobel was to close its doors and move relics to St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Windsor. That is, before local families and individuals, other Eastern North Carolina Episcopal churches, Albemarle Deanery, and Diocese of East Carolina joined to keep its doors open. Courtesy of their collaborative efforts, the church established in 1883 and maintained its original structure keeps its doors open as a mission church.
Record #:
38119
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the mystique built up around Blackbeard the past three centuries, the scant details that can be defined as truth have been coated with generous layers of fiction. Defining his life and death as more a series of questions than statements are speculations such as the location of his treasure and real name. Counted as closer to the truth by historical interpreters and members of the North Carolina Historical Society are Blackbeard’s ties with Bath and Colonial administrative officials. Contributing also to truth’s pursuit are the Blackbeard Jamboree. This festival includes activities such as seafaring and tavern songs and camps that reflect 17th and 18th-century maritime lifeways.
Record #:
38120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pirates found a profitable place in Eastern North Carolina because of shoals creating treacherous sailing conditions and inlets providing multiple traveling routes. Pirates also found a welcoming living environment due to the citizenry’s relatively relaxed attitudes about their lifestyle and authorities condoning activities like smuggling and wrecking. Additional proof the presence of pirates was not confined to Blackbeard were profiles of Stede Bonnet, Calico Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Charles Vane, Edward Low, George Lowther, and Richard Worley.
Record #:
38124
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Abstract:
It’s actually a replica of the lighthouse built in 1886 and copies the screw-pile design of the original. However, the Roanoke River Lighthouse in Plymouth reveals a genuine interest in and truth about the lifeways of an earlier time in Eastern North Carolina. Included is a timeline for that’s representative of both this lighthouse and the time period in which it was constructed.
Record #:
38121
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Abstract:
Helping to preserve the past is the current Historic Bath Exhibit Center, formerly Bath High School. Even if the word museum is not part of its title, the facility acts as such. Fulfilling this function are seasonal exhibits, like the summer’s history of barbecue exhibit, long term exhibits like Theodore de Bry illustrations, and anticipated long term exhibit about Blackbeard.
Record #:
38118
Author(s):
Abstract:
The small-town persona of the past included Main Street as the main street and Bijou Theatre. For Columbia, the cinema on the corner of Main and Elm Streets provided a major source of entertainment and helped define the way of life in the small town. Seven days a week, three times a day, and for nearly fifty years, the Columbia Theatre became a landmark in the community and backdrop for many locals on life’s stage.
Record #:
38123
Author(s):
Abstract:
Withstanding the test of time is one of the few schools of its kind in Halifax County: Allen Grove Rosenwald School. Making history is a facility on the National Register of Historic Places and started in 1921 to provide an education for African American children.
Record #:
38122
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Abstract:
The 250th anniversary of Windsor’s founding yielded a three days’ celebration. Food and fun were offered by food trucks and carriage rides. Entertainment and enlightenment were provided in music by the Pocosin Band, historic homes tours, and visits to the “Back in the Day” museum.