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10 results for Bertie County--History
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Record #:
12563
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Encompassing 682 square miles, two major rivers, and several small creeks, Bertie County served as the unofficial seat during early colonial times. Predominately an agricultural region assisted by a mild climate and a 214 day growing season, Bertie has little industrial wealth outside of lumber and tobacco. Established in 1722 and home to historic conflicts such as Culpepper's Rebellion as well as the Battle of Batchelor's Bay, Bertie County grew in prosperity with the onset of the steamboat age and improved transportation within the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 24, Apr 1964, p8-10, 24-28, il, map
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Record #:
13447
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The 20th-century merges with the past on the Cashie River in Bertie County, as the Sans Souci Ferry now plies its passage in the wake of outboard motorboats. Frail, yet functional, the ferry was originally propelled the operator pulling on a steering cable; now its power comes from a gasoline engine. Operated toll free by the State Highway Commission, the ferry is located east of Windsor off U.S. Highway 17.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 11, Oct 1961, p19, il
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Record #:
18461
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Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Bertie County, which is one of the oldest in the state having been formed in 1722. Among its outstanding attractions are historic homes, Snakebite Township, fine farming land, good hunting and fishing, and Cousin Wayland Spruill.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 32, Jan 1942, p1-2, 17-20, il
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Record #:
23286
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Bertie County's small historical town Aulander has much to offer to visitors and locals alike.
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Record #:
22463
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This article explores the possibility that 17th century German explorer John Lederer, reached Bertie County, North Carolina during his 1670 expedition into the Piedmont of North Carolina. Using prior analysis of Lederer's expedition as well as historical documentation, the author approximates the route and extent of the expedition.
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Record #:
38122
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The 250th anniversary of Windsor’s founding yielded a three days’ celebration. Food and fun were offered by food trucks and carriage rides. Entertainment and enlightenment were provided in music by the Pocosin Band, historic homes tours, and visits to the “Back in the Day” museum.
Record #:
38129
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Early Station’s depot closing can be easily explained: Atlantic Coast’s ceasing operation meant the closure of a station once providing passage to towns like Ahoskie and Norfolk three times a day. The more recent spelling of the town’s name as Earleys can be explained as an error; it was named for the Early family. As for the light seen around the abandoned depot, it has yielded no explanation and much speculation. Speculations for this phenomenon: stories always involving a man’s decapitation and everlasting search by the man’s spirit for his head.
Record #:
38330
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Bertie County Items taken from ’The Historical & Genealogical Register,’ 1903.
Record #:
38896
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Thomas Barker, a native of Rhode Island, arrived in Edenton, NC in 1735 and by 1741 moved to a plantation in Bertie Co., NC. He began a political career being a clerk in the Lower House of Commons in 1736, a member of the NC Assembly from Bertie County in 1742 and selected as Public Treasurer for the northern district. He was a successful attorney in Edenton, NC and continued in politics and was chosen to represent the NC colony in England in 1761. After living in England, the Revolutionary War broke out and he could not get back to North Carolina until 1778. After his extended absence, Barker was no longer a citizen by law and had to take the oath of Allegiance to stop the forfeiture of his property to the State. In 1779, he was granted citizenship and retired from public service.