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6 results for Columbus County--History
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Record #:
5862
Author(s):
Abstract:
Columbus County, formed in 1808 from parts of neighboring counties, is NEW EAST magazine's featured county of the month. Thompson discusses the history of the county and current economic conditions.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p22, 32-33, 35-36, il
Record #:
13215
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally, a tract of land between Whiteville and the South Carolina border, Columbus County is an expansive region, encompassing 939 square miles. Inhabited by Native Americans (pre-contact-1734), and serving as a refuge for non-combatants (1871), as well as a retreat for criminals and military renegades (1871-1808), Columbus County is historically known for the production of naval stores and the exploitation of lumber.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 13, Nov 1954, p14-22, il, map
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Record #:
13216
Author(s):
Abstract:
Including Vineland, Tabor City, Cerro Gordo, Hallsboro, Old Dock, Pireway, Bolton, Acme-Delco, Evergreen, and Brunswick, Alspaugh discuss the communities and associated histories that comprise Columbus County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 13, Nov 1954, p25, 27-29, il
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Record #:
24726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whiteville, North Carolina is a town of progressive stores and is the center of a wide trading area. This article provides the history and growth of the town, which serves as a model of progressiveness as North Carolina seeks to move forward.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 38, February 1949, p14-18, il
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Record #:
35559
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s visit to this county, founded in 1803 and from parts of Bladen and Brunswick counties, revealed its value. Value was defined earlier by its lumber companies and railroads, later by bright leaf tobacco and strawberries. How it maintained value, despite the post WWII mass migration of its youth? That was through factors it had in common with its neighboring counties. There were still beaches and fishing grounds. There was still a community of citizens and civic organizations willing to welcome newcomers.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p22, 32-33, 35-36
Record #:
35695
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Bigfoot Legend was widespread: sightings in Columbus and Brunswick Counties proved this. The discovery in Winnabow of footprint tracks, nearly a foot and a half long, was no exception to the standard story. Where they from man or beast of exceptional size, though? One native offered a $25.00 cash award for anyone willing to provide proof.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p42-43