NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


27 results for "Boats and boating"
Currently viewing results 16 - 27
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
26741
Author(s):
Abstract:
Finding the perfect boat is a challenge for North Carolina hunters because of the variety of conditions under which they pursue their game. Friends of Wildlife recommend three different types of duck boats, each of which is adapted to a particular kind of hunting. They include a 14’ aluminum canoe, a 12’ fiberglass sneak boat, and a 16’ jon boat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p3-7, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26840
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many fishermen don’t realize how helpful their boat can be in finding fish. The secret to finding fish is mobility. An outboard can help fishermen to explore areas, troll for fish, move along the shoreline, and access weed beds or holes in open water.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1981, p10, por
Record #:
29121
Author(s):
Abstract:
Powerboat sales have increased, with more boats, engines and trailers sold in North Carolina than all but five other states. With this rise in sales, marine owners and operators are investing more in upgrades and exansions.
Subject(s):
Record #:
29935
Abstract:
In the early days, sailing vessels were used to transport goods from the mainland to the villages on the Outer Banks. Using two-masted vessels, crew would sail to Elizabeth City for food, supplies, building materials, and coal.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p22-23, por
Record #:
29956
Author(s):
Abstract:
For easy-to-handle and stable boats for oystering, North Carolinians 1880s chose the sharpie. From the 1880s to the 1930s, sharpies provided oystermen with high decks and rounded sterns to maneuver in the reefs and sounds.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p31, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29954
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the advantage of shallow draft and sea worthiness of a deep hulled boat, the North Carolina shad boat is of simple construction and provides a practical design for fishing.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p30, por
Record #:
30165
Author(s):
Abstract:
A busy schedule of boating events occurred in North Carolina's waters this fall, beginning with the South Atlantic Regatta. This was followed by Labor Day races, moth boat races, and outboard motor races in other areas such as Elizabeth City, New Bern, and Washington.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
31400
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Commission provides a listing of areas that provide fishing and boating access across North Carolina. From lakes and rivers to reservoirs and beaches, North Carolina offers a large variety of access points for all manner of recreational boating and fishing activities.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1965, p17-19, por, map
Record #:
35955
Author(s):
Abstract:
The harvest of the sea one could see in fish captured in nets, also captured on film by the Sea Chest’s staff. It was possible because of the area’s boats, six of which were also featured in film.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p65-69
Record #:
36000
Abstract:
Boat building was described by way of steps such as chime plank cutting and bending the sides of the boat and parts such as transom, keel, ribs, bow stem, bottom, and washboards. Accompanying the textual description were pictures of these parts. Included were pictures of the steps in the boat building process such as bending the boat sides and cutting chime plank.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p
Record #:
36001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Maggie Austin’s story, people from small towns like Frisco and decades past could relate to. In her youth, common were one-room schoolhouses and schooling stopped at the seventh grade, traveling by boat and on dirt roads. For all the disadvantages focused on by younger generations and city residents, she asserted Hatteras Island to be the best place to live.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p48-49
Record #:
36013
Abstract:
Woodworks that became part of the Sea Chest’s “Crafts Curators” collection included decoys and boats carved by Moody Austin and flying birds constructed by Preston Stowe.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p60-61