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16 results for Tar Heel Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979
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Record #:
29188
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s oldest local agricultural celebration, the Chadbourn Strawberry Festival, will open on April 30 and continue until May 5. The strawberry industry in Columbus County began in 1895 and reached its peak in 1907 when Chadbourn was declared the Strawberry Capital of the World. The festival celebrates the industry and traditions with a parade, bake sale, contest and auction.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p6-7, il
Record #:
29195
Author(s):
Abstract:
The C.S.S. Neuse was a Confederate ship that grounded on a sandbar of the Neuse River near Kinston on April 23, 1864. To keep the Union troops from using the Neuse vessel, it was set afire with an explosion that blasted a hole in the port side. The remains of the Neuse are on display in Kinston.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p30-31, il, map
Record #:
29190
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1900s, mountain households in North Carolina were prepared for most illnesses and emergencies no matter what season. The author describes mountain living during that time and how his family made home remedies of natural herbs. To supplement herbs, farm produce was traded for medicine supplied at the country store.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p16-71, il
Record #:
29196
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bluff Mountain, deep in the Blue Ridge of Ashe County, has been prized by conservation scientists for years as the single most significant, unspoiled area in North Carolina. The mountain holds majestic scenery, diverse habitat, and rare fauna and flora. Bluff Mountain takes its name from a protruding rock bluff on its northeastern face.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p37, il
Record #:
29194
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Stoneybrook Steeplechase will begin on April 14 in Southern Pines, North Carolina. Once an event mainly for interested equestrians, it has become a mania that draws thousands of people the area. Tradition manifests itself in various and sometimes bizarre ways, such as outrageous hats and outfits.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p27-29, il, por
Record #:
29197
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coast has been an essential quality of North Carolina lives. At the same time, there has been an increasing amount of development, pollution and destruction on the coast. To preserve the coast for the future, people must be mindful of how they interact with nature.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-60, il
Record #:
29193
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle at Moore’s Creek Bridge, which occurred on February 27, 1776, was the first combat of the Revolution in North Carolina. General McLeod led his soldiers into battle against the patriots while shouting, “King George and broad swords.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p22-66, il, map
Record #:
29189
Author(s):
Abstract:
At North Carolina’s three Small State Forests, visitors can talk to trees by pressing a button. The specially-marked trees play recordings which describe the tree’s ecology, its history, and its use. The Small State Forests were developed to teach the public about forests and how to better care for their land.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
29192
Abstract:
In March of 1914, Babe Ruth (George Herman Ruth) hit his first homerun as a professional baseball player in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The homerun occurred during the Baltimore Orioles’ spring training. Fayetteville was also where Ruth acquired his nickname Babe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p18, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
35808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Testament of the once prevalent agrarian culture was the building staple of family farms. Attesting its importance in family farm life were its many purposes, mostly practical. One not prosaic to the author was its ability, especially for children, to exude a mystique. This quality, helping rural life to possess a rustic charm, the author suggested also contributed to their lengthy history, continuing in the US through immigrants such as Scots and Swedes. It’s one that has generated long standing associations with other groups such as Mennonites and Amish.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p38-39
Record #:
35806
Author(s):
Abstract:
A sport gaining ground in a state known for its many mountains was rock climbing. Contributing to its rise in popularity (over 4500 climbers reported), were places to climb such as Hanging Rock State Park, Looking Glass Rock, Linville Gorge, and Stone Mountain State Park. Concluding the article were tips to make climbs full of thrills, and minus the chills and spills.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p33, 67
Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
35811
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before, the narrator focused on the profit and prestige generated from an invention that was mostly generator. Now, it was time to give credit to the true inventor, Bob Carson. As for the man already known for his inventive genius, Wild Bob was also known as a soul needing the Holy Spirit and nicknamed after the only type of spirit he saw fit to be filled with.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p45-47
Record #:
35807
Author(s):
Abstract:
The interview with this Big Band leader revealed his musical beginnings in the late 1930s with his band, the Duke Blue Devils, and his first musical influence, his father, a music teacher. Illustrations of an illustrious career included giving Doris Day her first opportunity as a band singer and touring overseas with Bob Hope for almost two decades. As for the musical genre he played, he was optimistic about its enduring popularity with modern audiences.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p35-36