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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Smith, Elizabeth Simpson
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Record #:
6545
Abstract:
Smith recounts the excursion made by inventor Thomas Edison to North Carolina in 1906. By then he was famous for his inventions, which included the phonograph, light bulb, and motion picture projector. Edison traveled with two steam-powered automobiles and brought his son and two mechanics with him. He had just developed an alkaline storage battery for autos, and came to North Carolina seeking cobalt. The inventor felt that by using cobalt he could reduce the weight of the battery from 67 pounds to 46.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p21, 50, por
Record #:
8966
Abstract:
Dr. A.S. Piggot moved to Lincoln County in 1861 and was not trusted because of his Yankee background. In 1862, one of only five Confederate laboratories specialized in wartime drugs opened in Lincoln County, attended by Piggott and his assistant, Wizzell. Little is known of the laboratory's operation during the war, but adequate anesthetics were provided for the battlefield.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 5, Oct 1978, p22-23, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12296
Abstract:
Talmadge Moose, a native of Albemarle, preserves the history of Stanly County by painting its citizens with an art style comparable to Grant Wood that has been labeled \"Southern Gothic.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 2, July 1973, p10-12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12325
Abstract:
The historic Lincoln County home, Vesuvius, built in 1792 by Revolutionary leader General Joseph A. Graham, was the birthplace of William A. Graham. Graham, was a lawyer, planter, and Governor of North Carolina, and he served as Secretary of the Navy under President Millard Fillmore where he gained notoriety for masterminding the Perry Expedition to Japan.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p12-14, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
29192
Abstract:
In March of 1914, Babe Ruth (George Herman Ruth) hit his first homerun as a professional baseball player in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The homerun occurred during the Baltimore Orioles’ spring training. Fayetteville was also where Ruth acquired his nickname Babe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p18, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
35706
Abstract:
A ghost who hung around Kings Mountain liked to catch rides with unsuspecting people passing by. First he would hop on the back of a horse, then on the backs of trucks when a more modern age arose.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35797
Abstract:
Harry Golden’s twenty first novel was about to be published. The lesser known of his literary endeavors was a journal, initially a private publication but turning public after the end of WWII. Before its demise in 1968, The Carolina Israelite had gained an international audience, offering him a taste of popularity before his bestselling author career was launched with Only in America.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p17-19
Record #:
35775
Abstract:
Encounters of the UFO kind were common in NC, the author revealed; in fact, NC was fourth in the nation for this phenomena. To explain the frequency, Smith suggested factors such as magnetic disturbances, geological faults, electrical generating plants and transmission lines, military bases, mountains and water. As for explanations of their presence, they range from scientific to spiritual. Included as additional support for their importance included statistics on the percentage of Americans who believe in UFOs, governmental organizations that study this phenomenon, and photos of sightings NASA has declared genuine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p14-15, 54-55