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Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38
Record #:
35958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s enduring legend, well known in Beaufort, was anchored in other Eastern North Carolina towns. Connections sunk deeply in New Bern included a house, as well as anchor and manacles reportedly from a ship sunk not far from his house. As for intangible connections, there slave-owning stories possibly validated by the discovered manacles and anchor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p39
Record #:
36096
Abstract:
Picking up where earlier researchers had left off with MODERN GREECE were eleven ECU’s maritime studies students. An early casualty of the Union, this blockade runner was found in the early 1960s. This team resumed the work of examining, cataloging, and describing the 11,500 artifacts from the ship sunk off the coast of Fort Fisher. Among those items were tableware, seen in an accompanying photo.
Record #:
36110
Author(s):
Abstract:
An ECU professor didn’t have to travel far to find treasure. Among treasure discovered by Ashley White was a shipwreck, originally found around the Outer Banks in the late 1930s and much later confirmed as Blackbeard’s flagship. Another treasure trove, discovered near Ocala, FL, were coins minted during the reign of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella.