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32 results for Legends
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Record #:
36890
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Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
30997
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According to paranormal investigators, just about every community across North Carolina has a stretch of railroad tracks haunted by a train accident victim carrying a lantern, looking for his head. Ghost hunters from the National Society of Paranormal Investigation and Research in Raleigh describe some of the most notable ghost sitings and haunted areas in the state.
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Record #:
28688
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Charles Baldwin, a conductor for the Wilmington & Manchester Railroad, died in a railroad accident in 1856. Details of his death have been told as are several legends, all of which depict Baldwin as a hero.
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Record #:
31166
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There are many legends and mysteries surrounding Hickory Nut Gorge in western North Carolina. The early settlers found gold, tso-lungh (a magical, legendary tobacco), legends of talking animals, the mysterious Little People who lived among the craggy peaks of the gorge, and ominous sounds of Rumbling Bald Mountain. This article describes these stories and relevant tourist destinations at the gorge, Chimney Rock, and Lake Lure.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 10, Oct 2003, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35936
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Since 1867 when Joe Baldwin was killed and decapitated by a train accident, multiple stories have been circulated about a strange light appearing, symbolizing Joe looking for his missing head. The accounts vary, but some aspects of the legend stay the same, such as the light, time of appearance, and location.
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Record #:
36428
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A personal interpretation of a NC legend about a hunter by Angie Brown, Seagrove Middle School, Seagrove, NC.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 1985, p12-14, il
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Record #:
8662
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Dr. Francis Joseph Kron built his homestead at the foot of the Uwharrie Mountains in Stanley County during the 1830s. Kron was a medical doctor who would always travel to help a patient, no matter the difficulty in reaching them. According to his diary, Kron spent a lot of time traveling and learning new things. He also taught French at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania. Kron's daughters never married and, following the last daughter's death in 1910, the Kron home place fell into disrepair. A legend began that Kron had buried his fortune on his property but had invoked ghosts to keep anyone from ever taking it. Stories have since been told about people who tried to find Kron's gold but were stopped by ghouls. To this day, none of Kron's gold has been found. Either it doesn't exist or just maybe the ghosts have been successful in keeping it safe.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p20-22, por
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Record #:
35826
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Learning part of a song when he was a boy, the author strove to find the full song when he finished high school. As the tale goes, Johnny Sands and Patty Haig married after happening upon a pot of buried treasure. Wanting the gold for herself, Patty Haig attempted to kill Johnny, but ended up dying herself.
Record #:
35825
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Known as a folk legend in the Southern Appalachia region, two tales regarding Daniel Boone are recorded here.
Record #:
35870
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A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
35879
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Countering the appeal of Jaws, the latest film beast offering chills, thrills, and spills, was Stanley’s story of the great white hog. It proved that these triple attraction factors were not necessary to generate a tantalizing tale.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
9060
Abstract:
The Appalachian Boomerang is a recurring legend in much of North Carolina mountain folklore. Several stories exist regarding the origins of the boomerang including that it comes from Australia, and that it was invented by Daniel Boomer. It was used primarily for hunting raccoon.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p22-23, il
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Record #:
35695
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The Bigfoot Legend was widespread: sightings in Columbus and Brunswick Counties proved this. The discovery in Winnabow of footprint tracks, nearly a foot and a half long, was no exception to the standard story. Where they from man or beast of exceptional size, though? One native offered a $25.00 cash award for anyone willing to provide proof.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35795
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In the mid-1800s, a house in Lenoir County was erected by Jesse Jackson, and housed the Jackson family line until 1976, when Simon Jackson, the last of his name, died. Simon Jackson was an eccentric man with a multitude of stories attached to his name, some of which are recounted here.
Record #:
30569
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This article critiques local history writings for their general lack of accuracy and scope, and its reliance on local myths and legends. Local histories should have a deeper understanding of the socio-cultural and artistic heritage of its subjects.