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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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32 results for Legends
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Record #:
35270
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The author tells a story of when he and several of his friends went camping at a place that was supposedly inhabited by the Devil.
Record #:
36890
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Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
28688
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Charles Baldwin, a conductor for the Wilmington & Manchester Railroad, died in a railroad accident in 1856. Details of his death have been told as are several legends, all of which depict Baldwin as a hero.
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Record #:
28624
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The reputed ride of Polly Slocumb to the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge in 1776 is a legend of North Carolina history. The lack of proof has prompted historians to doubt whether the event actually occurred.
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Record #:
8662
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Dr. Francis Joseph Kron built his homestead at the foot of the Uwharrie Mountains in Stanley County during the 1830s. Kron was a medical doctor who would always travel to help a patient, no matter the difficulty in reaching them. According to his diary, Kron spent a lot of time traveling and learning new things. He also taught French at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania. Kron's daughters never married and, following the last daughter's death in 1910, the Kron home place fell into disrepair. A legend began that Kron had buried his fortune on his property but had invoked ghosts to keep anyone from ever taking it. Stories have since been told about people who tried to find Kron's gold but were stopped by ghouls. To this day, none of Kron's gold has been found. Either it doesn't exist or just maybe the ghosts have been successful in keeping it safe.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p20-22, por
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Record #:
14992
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About half a mile east of the village of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on a peak known as Piney Prospect, stands one of the State's unique structures - grim and ghostly Gimghoul Castle. Owned by the Order of Gimghouls, a secret organization at the University of North Carolina, the castle resembles a pre-Norman English castle. Many strange and fantastic tales surround Gimghoul Castle and Piney Prospect, such as the myth of Peter Dromgoole, killed in a duel over a maid.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 36, Feb 1943, p6-7, 24, f
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Record #:
35670
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A collection of stories from teenage boys about ghosts, haunted houses, murder, and more.
Record #:
35151
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This article touches on some of the most popular aspects of the Outer Banks. It deals with the origins of its original inhabitants, including people and ponies, some place names and topographic terms, wrecking practices of Nags Head, and more.
Record #:
30997
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According to paranormal investigators, just about every community across North Carolina has a stretch of railroad tracks haunted by a train accident victim carrying a lantern, looking for his head. Ghost hunters from the National Society of Paranormal Investigation and Research in Raleigh describe some of the most notable ghost sitings and haunted areas in the state.
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Record #:
35597
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Supposedly a Native American legend, this story was published by Zebulon Baird Vance in 1852. It tells the story of a Native American warrior who journeyed east to acquire a gun, in order to kill a great serpent, which had been terrorizing the tribe.
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Record #:
35879
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Countering the appeal of Jaws, the latest film beast offering chills, thrills, and spills, was Stanley’s story of the great white hog. It proved that these triple attraction factors were not necessary to generate a tantalizing tale.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
9060
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The Appalachian Boomerang is a recurring legend in much of North Carolina mountain folklore. Several stories exist regarding the origins of the boomerang including that it comes from Australia, and that it was invented by Daniel Boomer. It was used primarily for hunting raccoon.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p22-23, il
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Record #:
35795
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In the mid-1800s, a house in Lenoir County was erected by Jesse Jackson, and housed the Jackson family line until 1976, when Simon Jackson, the last of his name, died. Simon Jackson was an eccentric man with a multitude of stories attached to his name, some of which are recounted here.
Record #:
35156
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Two stories centering on Edward Teach, or Blackbeard’s, time in North Carolina. One is about his time in Bath, and the other is the legend of him burying a chest of money.
Record #:
35695
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The Bigfoot Legend was widespread: sightings in Columbus and Brunswick Counties proved this. The discovery in Winnabow of footprint tracks, nearly a foot and a half long, was no exception to the standard story. Where they from man or beast of exceptional size, though? One native offered a $25.00 cash award for anyone willing to provide proof.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p42-43