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20 results for "Tall tales"
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Record #:
37428
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The tale was perpetuated by Paul Jennewein, who helped to preserve Wilmington’s cultural and spiritual traditions through his column “Along the Cape Fear.” First published in StarNews in 1950, the tall tale contains an element common to legend: a possible foundation of truth. The capture of flounder could have happened during the Great Depression for families not able to afford the customary Christmas turkey or ham.
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Record #:
8462
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Storytellers sit around Dawse Cook's blacksmith shop in Millerville, recounting tall tells about summer's most hated insect, the mosquito. The stories include tales about how many mosquitoes a bird eats in a day, a chicken-eating mosquito, a mosquito that unscrewed its short bill and replaced it with a long one, and mosquitoes that get drunk from sucking on men drinking moonshine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p22-23, il
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Record #:
25013
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Many a story has been passed down about sea turtles. From the Hindu tale of the turtle with the world on its back, to the myth that sea turtle eggs are an aphrodisiac all are tall tales.
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Record #:
35826
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Learning part of a song when he was a boy, the author strove to find the full song when he finished high school. As the tale goes, Johnny Sands and Patty Haig married after happening upon a pot of buried treasure. Wanting the gold for herself, Patty Haig attempted to kill Johnny, but ended up dying herself.
Record #:
9024
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Jess Greene of Stanly County died in March of 1977 at the age of eighty-three. Greene told some of the best tall tales, most of which were partially autobiographical. One of his tales concerning a mule he owned in re-told in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 9, Feb 1979, p14-15, 37, il, por
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Record #:
35581
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A story about how a player hit a baseball onto the top of a passing train, and the opposing team had to retrieve it from the next town over.
Record #:
35597
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Supposedly a Native American legend, this story was published by Zebulon Baird Vance in 1852. It tells the story of a Native American warrior who journeyed east to acquire a gun, in order to kill a great serpent, which had been terrorizing the tribe.
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Record #:
35593
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The two stories are about money that is supposedly buried in the remains of a community, and the ghost of Lady Vanderbilt, who haunted a cabin in the woods.
Record #:
35495
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This is a synopsis of the novel Sea-Gift, written by Edwin W. Fuller in 1873. The author of the article believes this to be the earliest example of tall tale narratives in America.
Record #:
35415
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A variant of the tales “Suppose” and “The Well,” about a hypothetical death.
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Record #:
35370
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In the Aarne-Thompson index, Tale Type 62 refers to “Peace among the Animals-the Fox and the Cock.” The opening story is a variation of that type, and the author continues on to analyze similar variations.
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Record #:
35379
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A tale about a patient buzzard and an impatient hawk is the basis for the author’s analysis of story variations. It is a companion article to one published in the previous issue, titled “The Fox and the Goose.”
Record #:
35263
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The author highlights some of the biggest challenges when comparing tall tales. He sectioned them as the “manuscript collection,” “motif identification,” “computer processing,” “content analysis,” “structural analysis,” ”bibliography,” and “present motif-index.”
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