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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Great Depression
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Record #:
18493
Author(s):
Abstract:
One approach to putting people back to work during the Great Depression was commissioning artists to paint murals on federal buildings. Artists were chosen not on need but through anonymous competitions. The program ran from 1934 to 1943. During that time over 1,300 murals and 300 sculptures were commissioned nationwide. The article contains a list of post offices in the state where murals can still be viewed and buildings that were destroyed along with the murals.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Jan 2013, p16, il
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Record #:
35844
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mules have a longtime reputation among farmers as strong and stubborn. Add to this homing, or the ability to find their way to the homestead. As for how hybrid beasts like Belle was able to, explanations were offered such as backtracking, sniffing out their own tracks, and night eyes, what the author described as “horn like patches” on their inner forelegs, slightly above the knees.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35851
Author(s):
Abstract:
A mute peddler the author called “the vanilla man” offered a string of pearls with the purchase of his product. Its true value, she realized, was irrevocably lost with the string of pearls broken.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p26-27, 55
Record #:
37428
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tale was perpetuated by Paul Jennewein, who helped to preserve Wilmington’s cultural and spiritual traditions through his column “Along the Cape Fear.” First published in StarNews in 1950, the tall tale contains an element common to legend: a possible foundation of truth. The capture of flounder could have happened during the Great Depression for families not able to afford the customary Christmas turkey or ham.
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Record #:
38284
Author(s):
Abstract:
The big band leader who found fame in Hollywood and New York faded into obscurity once he returned to his home state. Kay Kyser, at the height of his fame during the Great Depression and World War II, scored 35 top ten hits, despite not being able to read sheet music or play an instrument. He earned fame by the zaniness and sense of humor displayed during his band performances.
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