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3 results for New Deal, 1933-1939
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Record #:
8520
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1933, the nation was in the midst of the Great Depression. One of President Franklin Roosevelt's plans to get people back to work was the National Industry Recovery Act of 1933. The act established the Subsistence Homesteads Division in the Interior Department. The purpose was to create towns that would help farmers and industrial workers by moving families to homestead farming communities and planned mill towns. Penderlea, in Pender County, was the first homestead farm project in the nation. Gannon describes the building of Penderlea, what life was like there, and what the town is like in 2007.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p14-15, il
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Record #:
16004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scholarly examination of New Deal effects on African Americans largely focuses on negative aspects of President Roosevelt's program. However, during this period, the President appointed nearly one hundred African American advisers \"who focused on ending racial discrimination in federal programs.\" One such adviser was Lawrence Augustus Oxley and he is the focus of this paper which hopes to illuminate an understudied scholastic topic.
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Record #:
21312
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Deal of the 1930s that impacted Indian society was designed to correct the erroneous policies of the previous 50 years. Despite its best attempts, it failed to have a significant impact on the Cherokee of western North Carolina. The infusion of public money weakened the tribe's economic foothold as members were discouraged from farming and cultural handicraft.
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