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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for "Renewable energy"
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Record #:
30891
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Abstract:
A shortage of electric capacity, huge increases in demand for power, and the cost of climate change are in the making of a perfect storm. North Carolina electric cooperatives discuss plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions based on technological solutions including energy efficiency, carbon capture and storage, and renewable sources.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p10-11, il
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Record #:
30892
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Carrboro High School, the newest school in the Orange County school system, teaches students daily about using energy and natural resources carefully. The design and construction of the school buildings emphasize energy conservation, water reduction, high efficiency lighting, and positive indoor air quality.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p14-15, il
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Record #:
30898
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New energy policy legislation requires electric cooperatives, by 2018, to have ten percent of their total electricity needs generated from renewable resources or displaced through effective energy efficiency programs. More renewable energy for North Carolina will need an upgraded transmission network to go where it will be needed.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p12, il
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Record #:
30981
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Since the 1970s, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have been engaged in promoting renewable energy resources such as wind, solar, hydropower, and biomass. Consumers in the state currently benefit from over two percent of their power from hydro resources, as well as small self-contained solar and wind projects. Challenges to renewable energy include transmission, intermittency and the need for advancements in storage technology, as well as high construction costs and delays.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p8, il
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Record #:
30980
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North Carolina’s electric cooperatives distribute electricity produced from a variety of sources including carbon-neutral nuclear generation, natural gas, diesel generation, coal, hydro and renewable resources. This diversity of energy resources helps ensure that electricity remains reliable and as affordable as possible. New state legislation mandates that three percent of electric cooperatives’ energy be met through renewable energy products.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p7, il
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Record #:
30979
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North Carolina is looking for renewable energy sources and alternatives to help improve energy efficiency and reduce demand. However, there are significant obstacles to acquire these resources and the costs are expensive. This article discusses current energy sources in North Carolina, environmental conditions, and some of the challenges in energy conservation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p5, por
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Record #:
31000
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Piedmont Electric and a solar energy developer, both based in Hillsborough, North Carolina, are making progress toward lowering the cost of solar-generated electricity. They have developed a new model of smaller power plants that can generate electricity economically and environmentally safe. The new grid system of solar “trees” will provide power to residents in Caswell County.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 11, Nov 2008, p8, il
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Record #:
31044
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NC GreenPower was launched in 2003 to encourage the development of renewable energy resources in North Carolina through voluntary, tax-deductible contributions that individuals can make through their electric bills or directly to the program. The minimum contribution level is four-dollars per block of renewable energy generated and added to North Carolina’s power grid.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 8, Aug 2007, p10, il
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Record #:
31075
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Trash emits enough methane gas to generate electricity that can supply more than six-hundred average North Carolina houses every day. While North Carolina produces more than ten-million tons of trash in landfills per year, the state is investing in landfill gas production and other renewable energy projects.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 2006, p8, il
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Record #:
31201
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North Carolina energy interests are developing a means for consumers to assist in the development of renewable energy resources. If approved, the program called NC GreenPower would allow consumers individually and voluntarily to make an additional payment in their electricity bill to help utilities acquire renewable power. The program is designed to create a market and an incentive for companies to develop and sell green power.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p10, il, por
Record #:
36299
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Abstract:
A positive economic and occupational impact in North Carolina is possible through its growth in industries such as alternate energy. Such an impact is also perceived worldwide. Attesting to this domestic and international impact is insights from eight of the industry’s experts.
Record #:
36312
Author(s):
Abstract:
FLS Energy, a solar energy company, joined the ranks of other privately owned businesses with bright economic and occupational futures in North Carolina. Among the other 99 companies highlighted were Ennis-Flint, Rodgers Builders, Camco, Hissho Sushi, and Allen Industries. Factors these businesses often held in common included employees retaining majority ownership, being family owned, and starting with a single product.