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39 results for "Outer Banks--Culture"
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Record #:
35959
Author(s):
Abstract:
There were many examples of words retaining the original spelling, while having the pronunciation style of the area embedded. Noteworthy included harrycane (hurricane) and Hattress (Hatteras). Words with village values embedded included fryin’ (boiling, in reference to the sea) and meeting house (church).
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1975, p40
Record #:
35998
Abstract:
Among Mrs. Cynthia Rollinson’s recollections of life were the lives she helped delivered as a midwife. As for life from decades ago, she could attest to a time when homes had ice boxes instead of refrigerators. She could also attest to a way Hatteras Island seemed futuristic, even in its dependency on kerosene as a light source: it had windmills.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35994
Author(s):
Abstract:
Toys common during her great grandmother’s childhood were rag dolls for girls and carved boats for boys. These objects had the role toys typically play in any culture: to prepare children for anticipated gender roles to take on as adults. As to another cultural aspect revealed, the toys reflected a time perhaps regarded as simpler by many younger generations.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p6-7
Record #:
35997
Abstract:
Moody Austin’s knowledge known was as a model boat builder and decoy carver. Knowledge collected included trips to Manteo that took a day, dirt roads, and cars as a rare sight. Those days on Hatteras Island were also part of a time when kerosene was the only light source, a schoolhouse accommodated children of all ages, and no businesses.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p36-37
Record #:
36000
Abstract:
Boat building was described by way of steps such as chime plank cutting and bending the sides of the boat and parts such as transom, keel, ribs, bow stem, bottom, and washboards. Accompanying the textual description were pictures of these parts. Included were pictures of the steps in the boat building process such as bending the boat sides and cutting chime plank.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p
Record #:
35996
Abstract:
The post office could be defined as little by size, touted as the third smallest in the United States and second smallest in operation. It could also be defined in little in relation to its location, the village of Salvo. As for its distinction of being the oldest post office on the island, its reputation could be described as larger than life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p16-18
Record #:
36005
Author(s):
Abstract:
The school system as she knew it back then: one room buildings, students of all ages taught together, and a salary of thirty five dollars a month. It may be surprising, then, for her to conclude those conditions better. A common explanation may be a salary almost a tenth of a contemporary salary stretching further. A less common conclusion may echo Leona Meekins’: God’s providence provided a fortunate and richly lived life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p22-25
Record #:
36003
Author(s):
Abstract:
It had dominated short wave radio broadcasts on September 12, 1944, and still dominated the memories of many residents. Power to generate remembrance could be explained by the winds, exceeding 100 miles per hour, and 96 of the 115 homes damaged or washed off their blocks. Perhaps, though, a greater explanation can lie in no human casualties or homes badly damaged. From that, God at work in the midst of Mother Nature’s wrath was a possibility still speculated.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p16-17
Record #:
36007
Abstract:
With its water encroached existence, who became known later as Coast Guard was a natural need. Generations of Midgetts keeping the occupational tradition alive proved its value measured in ways deeper than the coastal waters. A collective generational expression was the Chicamacomico Historical Society's upkeep of one of the lifesaving stations. Efforts by a younger generation came from the Cape Hatteras High School Chicamacomico Lifesavers Club.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p29-33
Record #:
36001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Maggie Austin’s story, people from small towns like Frisco and decades past could relate to. In her youth, common were one-room schoolhouses and schooling stopped at the seventh grade, traveling by boat and on dirt roads. For all the disadvantages focused on by younger generations and city residents, she asserted Hatteras Island to be the best place to live.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p48-49
Record #:
36010
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called the gateway to Hatteras Island, the bridge built in the 1960s and named after Senator Herbert Bonner was experiencing the wear and tear of commuting use. Limitations on its daily use were imposed during its repair period. Such an occasion made Island residents all the more aware of the bridge’s importance in their way of life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p46-47
Record #:
36008
Abstract:
A fading art kept alive yet by quilters such as Mrs. Charlotte Balance. Tales told by Mrs. Nettie Gibson revealed changes in quilting standards. Decades ago, the summer and winter quilting parties noted by Mrs. Ballance made it a commonly collective activity. The experience, then, was quite different from the common contemporary practice of quilting as a solo project.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p41
Record #:
36006
Abstract:
Built in Morehead City during the Great Depression, it was the first ferry to run on Hatteras Island. With its important role, the Hadeco became more than a form of human transport or mail delivery. It helped to define a way of life for decades to come.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p26-28
Record #:
36011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The resident named for her father’s mule or a family member held values characteristic of Hatteras Island life, such as deep religious beliefs. Activities betraying the time in which she grew up included her mother sewing clothes for a family of twelve. Ways she made a personal mark on her world included opening her home to tourists and village newcomers alike. From such acts of hospitality, a life commonly lived might also be called an uncommon life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p48-52
Record #:
36012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Were they papers worth far more than the paper they were printed on? That question was prompted by the discovery of documents, letters, and receipts in the former wreck commissioner’s 150 year old house. A photocopied septet of documents, all over 110 years old, were available for readers to decide for themselves whether the items were trash or treasure.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p54-57