NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for "Groundwater--North Carolina"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
34077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater protection in North Carolina, which primarily the responsibility of the Groundwater Section of the Division of Environmental Management, has been strengthened considerably over the past several years by many research and assessment efforts and by regulatory developments. The groundwater protection program aims to prevent pollution by facilities that generate or treat waste, restore polluted groundwater, and plan for the wise use and development of groundwater resources.
Record #:
34078
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s dispersed population pattern makes groundwater particularly important as a water supply for those who live far from city water systems. The Coastal Plain has several major aquifers which provide large and predictable supplies of quality groundwater. In the Piedmont and Mountain regions, the availability of groundwater is generally more limited and is highly variable.
Record #:
34118
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s fourth National Water Summary released in October indicates that the overall quality of the nation’s groundwater is good, but management and protection of groundwater resources remain major challenges. In North Carolina, the most common naturally occurring groundwater quality problem is the presence of saltwater in all aquifers in the eastern region. Contamination from landfills, waste lagoons, underground storage tanks, and accidental chemical spills also contribute to water quality problems.
Record #:
34179
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey has launched the National Water Quality Assessment Program to evaluate the quality of the nation’s groundwater and surface water, and the natural and human factors that affect quality of these resources. Proposed study units in North Carolina are the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage, the Upper Tennessee River Basin, and the Santee Basin and Coastal Drainage.
Record #:
34188
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town of Cary, North Carolina has developed a groundwater system which can provide the town supplemental water on a cost-effective basis. Development of the system was based on site selection criteria by the United States Geological Survey, and supports the contention that wells in the Piedmont can yield much larger quantities of water than previously thought. According to a recent report, the groundwater system was needed because of anticipated increases in the cost of purchasing water and surcharges for additional water from the City of Raleigh.
Record #:
34184
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rocks underlying the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces of North Carolina have the reputation of furnishing only small quantities of groundwater. According to a recent report by the United States Geological Survey, this impression is the result of the drilling of large numbers of low-yielding domestic wells without regard to geology, topography, and optimal construction.
Record #:
34183
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey recently released two reports on groundwater quality studies conducted at the United States Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina. The studies were undertaken in response to the increasing water supply needs of the Air Station and the potential for contamination of the Castle Hayne aquifer by waste disposal and spills. A summary of the results is provided in this article.
Record #:
34187
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County is a rapidly growing county in the southwestern Piedmont region of North Carolina, and concern for the quality of natural resources has steadily increased. The North Carolina State University Water Quality Group is assessing surface water, groundwater, and air quality of the county. Gaston County commissioners are using the assessment to evaluate the impacts of locating new industry and development in the area.
Record #:
34182
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the recently released United States Geological Survey, “National Water Summary 1987,” North Carolina withdrew about 7,880 million gallons per day of freshwater from surface- and ground-water sources in 1985. Summary results and statistics for the state’s water use are provided in this article.
Record #:
34158
Author(s):
Abstract:
The City of Raleigh is supporting a research team led by Dr. Larry King of North Carolina State University in a study of the soil properties of its sludge-treated fields, the composition of the crops grown there, and groundwater quality with attention to nitrates. The city plans to compost sludge to produce a product that can be used by the Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department in its landscaping program and be made available to farmers for use on specified crops.
Record #:
34160
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission has adopted revisions of the state’s groundwater standards and classifications. The new rules, which take effect August 1, are outlined and discussed in this article.
Record #:
34171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey published the results of a study begun in 1983 to better understand and define the groundwater flow system in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina. The report contains detailed narrative descriptions of Cretaceous aquifers as well as detailed maps of each aquifer. A summary of the aquifers and table are presented in this article.
Record #:
34216
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission will consider a request to hold public hearings on proposed revisions of the state’s groundwater classifications and standards. Revisions to the rules would essentially ease clean-up requirements and abandon the state’s nondegradation policy.
Record #:
34218
Author(s):
Abstract:
On February 11, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission approved holding public hearings on proposed changes to the rules that govern cleanup of contaminated groundwater. The proposed amendments represent a significant change from present practice since they would not always require the application of best available technology to restore groundwater to the level of the standard.
Record #:
34225
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Groundwater Section of the Division of Environmental Management is developing a Wellhead Protection Program as well as a Comprehensive State Groundwater Protection Program. A summary of these efforts is provided in this article.