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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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28 results for "Food industry and trade"
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Record #:
42870
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Culinary adventurist, Wendy Perry explores the following businesses and related owner's "recipes for success": Little Black Dressing Company, High Point; Mini's Mountain Mixes, Hendersonville; Elizabeth's Pecans, Turkey and 1 in 6 Snacks, Raleigh.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 52 Issue 11, November 2020, p12-14
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Record #:
34283
Abstract:
This section of Our State highlights the best places in North Carolina to find specialty items for a country meal. Places covered include meat from Smith’s Red & White in Rocky Mount, eggs from Massey Creek Farms in Madison, bread from Shiloh General Store in Hamptonville, milk from Mills River Creamery in Mills River, pimento cheese from Musten & Crutchfield in Kernersville, beer from Bestway Grocery in Greensboro, and chicken salad from Robert’s Grocery in Wrightsville Beach.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p124-144, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
38216
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The promise of better food through science was recognized in two initiatives promising to generate growth in jobs, markets for farmers, and manufacturing. One was the Plant Sciences Initiative, the other the Food Processing Innovation Center. Collectively, they promised to produce greater crop numbers, pioneer crop varieties, and lower farm animals’ feed expense. Collectively, they may also help to assure the supply of food needed to feed the world’s population, projected to be 9.6 billion by 2050.
Record #:
29800
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Abstract:
More people are beginning to understand the importance of local, organic food, but few know how to confront the large corporate retail chains that control what is on grocery store shelves. Local Organic Y’All is a North Carolina-based independent food advocacy group that aims to increase access to locally grown, organic food by engaging with mainstream supermarkets and wholesalers in the state.
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Record #:
34943
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Fayetteville businesses now sell locally produced jelly and milk products. This article highlights two businesses and the inspiration for their goods.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , October 2017, p62-65, il Periodical Website
Record #:
27656
Author(s):
Abstract:
From Morehead City to Asheville, there are a number of unique places in North Carolina to catch delicious midday meals of regional food.
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Record #:
29710
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Food cooperatives or co-ops emphasize independence and support for the local economy. Many co-ops, including Western North Carolina’s Hendersonville Food Co-op and French Broad Food Co-op, reach out to local producers and collaborate to create supply channels.
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Record #:
30598
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In 2016, Herbalife paid a $200 million to settle a lawsuit that claimed the company ran an illegal pyramid scheme. Manufactured in Winston-Salem, NC, Herbalife claims the maintain a legal multilevel marketing operation.
Record #:
36289
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Abstract:
A Sealed Air executive believed housekeeping employees, often on the bottom rung of an organization’s ladder, should have the way cleared to climb to the top. How she helped these employees receive due attention for their contribution was working to increase their career and educational opportunities.
Record #:
30685
Author(s):
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According to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, there are more than three-thousand small food businesses in the state dedicated to locally-sourced food products. Local food sales have grown significantly in the last five years, particularly in western North Carolina. This article highlights several local businesses and homegrown products relevant to the holidays.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Nov 2014, p18-19, il
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Record #:
31147
Author(s):
Abstract:
King addresses how planners can foster the development of local food systems and provides examples from across the state.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 38 Issue , 2013, p42-44, bibl
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Record #:
27898
Abstract:
Students, faculty, and staff at NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke are pursuing ways to change the food systems in their communities. These individuals are looking for ways to make systems more fair and reliant on crops and animals raised locally. Student activists are the ones who have taken the lead, pressuring their universities and communities to change their habits and provide them with organic, locally sourced foods from sustainable farms. Universities are beginning to listen and are working with students to adapt to this change.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p35-36 Periodical Website
Record #:
27947
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of when pimento cheese first appeared, its popularity in North Carolina and the south, and its cultural importance are explored. The Triangle area with Charlotte is the biggest market in the nation for pimento cheese. Ruth’s Salads of Charlotte is the top producer of the cheese in the nation. Pimento cheese gained popularity due to the fact it was cheap to make, tasted good, and convenient to take to work.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28116
Author(s):
Abstract:
The desire to have local and organic food available to students in the Triangle’s college dining halls is increasing. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students recently formed Fair, Local, Organic Food (FLO Flood) to advocate for the issue. The practice of having such food available is normal at Duke University. North Carolina State is beginning to look at ways to make this movement a reality. The food culture and desire of students request different food in dining halls in area universities is explored.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 9, February 2008, p21-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28135
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Demand is high in the Triangle area for locally raised organic meat and eggs and organic locally produced breads, but there is a lack of organic grain in the state. This lack of organic grain has prenvented small producers from serving the organic foods market. North Carolina State University is attempting to turn this trend around by using two recent grants to promote organic grain production. Local farmers talk about the lack of organic grain in the state and how the NC State program is helping them change that problem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 19, May 2008, p37 Periodical Website