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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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31 results for "Animal lore"
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Record #:
35150
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This is the author’s take on the origin of the phrase “he ought to be bored for the simples.”
Record #:
35530
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The tale about an incredibly tough to kill hog, and the similarities it poses to a story by William Faulkner.
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Record #:
35048
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A short story about the superstitions that a screech owl could foretell a death.
Record #:
23689
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Animals are wonderful things, some are comforting while others put the fear of God in you. The author gives a variety of tales from Pitt County about animals. In the 1890s there were belled buzzards at the Court House and “Buzzards Roost,” about where Chico’s is now situated. There are stories of large turkeys, eagles and the capturing of “bull Robins” to eat. There were songbirds in Greenville that could whistle popular tunes. There were attacking minks, huge snakes, large hogs, and buzzards who sounded like bears and fooled hunters.
Record #:
36890
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Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
35038
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The article has a preamble that the author had included with her story when she sent it to the editor, who liked it so much he decided to include it. The title of the article alludes to a turtle who wanted to learn to fly.
Record #:
35275
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A list of 15 superstitions relating to children, weather, love/marriage, and death.
Record #:
35670
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A collection of stories from teenage boys about ghosts, haunted houses, murder, and more.
Record #:
35252
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This article is the analysis of symbolism and folklore in the novel “The Track of the Cat.” The novel contains elements of animal symbolism, good versus evil, fear of the unknown, gender stereotypes, and death.
Record #:
35722
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In the novel “The Wedding Guest,” author Ovid Pierce included many different folkways, including proverbs, folk beliefs, animal lore, ghosts, and more.
Record #:
35267
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This is an excerpt from the newspaper Raleigh News and Observer about some superstitions regarding love and marriage.
Record #:
35721
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Throughout folklore, frogs are often associated with rain and one particular family that now lives in Columbus, Ohio, believe that frogs come to the earth via rain.
Record #:
35084
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Told from the perspective of an uncle to some children, this is a story of how a hunting dog was able to track down opossums from laying in a wheelbarrow when he was too old to walk. There is a recipe for pine bark stew at the end.
Record #:
35025
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Sheet music and lyrics to the ballad “Old Veen,” about a good hunting dog now laid to rest.
Record #:
37820
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A few tidbits about snake folklore, ducks, a fishing story, and a tool used for removing fishing hooks.